Champagne village profile: Barbonne-Fayel in the Sézannais

Key facts

Located in subregion/area: Côte des Blancs / Sézannais
Vineyards and grape varieties: 265.2 hectares (655.3 acres), of which 70% Chardonnay, 29% Pinot Noir, 1% Pinot Meunier, and 0.04% others.
Classification: “Autre cru” (87% and 85%).

Maps

The map is linked from Wikimedia Commons, and the geographical information originates from OpenStreetMap. The dotted white area corresponds to the vineyards, light yellow is other open terrain, orange is built-up areas, and green indicates forest.


Google Maps view with the villages in the Sézannais highlighted.

Clicking on a village opens a field to the left with a link to the village profile, if it exists.

Neighbouring villages within the Champagne appellation

North: Saudoy
South: Fontaine-Denis-Nuisy
Comment: some of the communes on the map are not part of the Champagne appellation and therefore don’t have any village profiles.

View over Barbonne-Fayel. Picture linked from Wikimedia Commons (photo François Goglins, 2013).

The village

Barbonne-Fayel is located about 7 km south of Sézanne, the central town of this area. Barbonne-Fayel is the largest of the other villages in the area.

The Barbonne-Fayel commune covers 2435 hectares and has 497 inhabitants (as of 2014). The inhabitants are called Barbonnots and Barbonnottes.

The town hall (mairie) of Barbonne-Fayel. Picture linked from Wikimedia Commons (photo François Goglins, 2013).

Vineyards

The vineyards in the Barbonne-Fayel commune is located to the west of the village, between it and the edge of the forest as well as around the D951 road in the southern part of the commune. They are located on mild east- to south-facing slopes. Chardonnay is the most common grape variety, by a wide margin.

The current vineyard surface in the Barbonne-Fayel commune is 265.2 hectares (655.3 acres). There are 186.6 ha Chardonnay (70.4%), 75.8 ha Pinot Noir (28.6%), 2.7 ha Pinot Meunier (1.0%), and 0.1 ha others (0.04%). Numbers from CIVC, as of 2013. In 1997, the vineyard surface was 253 ha. There are 105 vineyard owners (exploitants) in the commune.

Higher rating for Chardonnay

On the now defunct échelle des crus scale, where 100% = grand cru, 90-99% = premier cru, and 80-89% = ”autre cru”,  a smaller number of villages were rated differently for white and black grapes, i.e., for Chardonnay (white) and for Pinot Noir and Pinot Meunier (black). The 12 villages in the Sézannais, including Barbonne-Fayel, were among these, with 87% for white grapes and 85% for black grapes, which in both cases meant ”autre cru”.

Single vineyard sites

Single vineyard sites in Barbonne-Fayel include, among others:

  • Les Bonnots, a site with a mild slope westsouthwest of the village. Michel Marcoult Père et Fils produces a vineyard-designated Champagne from here, a rosé saignée from 100% Pinot Noir.
  • Les Carabins, a site with a mild slope westsouthwest of the village. Michel Marcoult Père et Fils produces a vineyard-designated Champagne from here, a 100% Pinot Noir.
  • Les Macrêts, a site with a mild south-facing slopes northwest of the village. Michel Marcoult Père et Fils produces a vineyard-designated Champagne from here, a 100% Chardonnay from old vines.
  • Les Maillons, the northernmost vineyard site in the commune, locate close to the border to Saudoy and the edge of the forest to the west. Of 6 ha, 2.5 ha are owned by the excellent small grower Ulysse Collin in Congy, who has Pinot Noir in this site. Two vineyard-designated Champagne from 100% Pinot Noir are produced, a white and from the 2011 vintage also a rosé.

Champagne producers

Champagne growers

Producer status is indicated where known: RM = récoltant-manipulant, or grower-producers. RC = récoltant-coopérateur, growers that are cooperative members but sell Champagnes under their own name. SR = société de récoltants, owned by a number of growers of the same family and sells under its own name.

  • La Bar La Bonne (RC), whose range includes a vintage Champagne.
  • Paul Guillot (RM), also Marcoult-Guillot.
  • Henri Landréa
  • Pierre Launay (RM), has 14 ha of vineyards of which 2/3 in Sézannais (Barbonne-Fayel and Broyes) and 1/3 in Barsequanis (Loches-sur-Ource, Buxeuil, and Gyé-sur-Seine). Has 51.5% Pinot Noir, 46% Chardonnay, and 2.5% Pinot Meunier in the vineyards. The range includes three vintage Champagnes, a regular composed of 50% Chardonnay and 50% Pinot Noir (refers to the 2008 vintage), a blanc de blancs consisting of  Chardonnay from Barbonne-Fayel, and Rubis, a rosé de saignée from 100% Pinot Noir. The company name is Champavigne.
  • Frédéric Leroy (RC)
  • Lheritier (Facebook page)
  • Michel Marcoult Père et Fils (RM, Facebook page), on the label written Marcoult Michel, a member of Vignerons Indépendants with 9.5 ha of vineyards, of which just over half in Sézannais and the rest in Vitryat and Côte des Bar. The range includes a vintage Champagne and three vineyards-designated Champagnes that are all vinified in oak barrels: Les Macrêts, a 100% Chardonnay from old vines, Les Bonnots, a rosé saignée from 100% Pinot Noir, and Les Carabins, a 100% Pinot Noir raised in acaia wooda.
  • Ronald Marcoult
  • Denis Pasquet (RC)
  • G. Richomme (SR), which has 11 ha of vineyards, of which 88% in Barbonne-Fayel and 12% in Bar-sur-Seine, and an annual production of about 50 000 bottles. The range includes a vintage Champagne which is 100% Chardonnay. 70 is a anniversary Champagne, from the 2011 vintage, produced for the producer’s 70th anniversary, and is composed of 70% Chardonnay and 30% Pinot Noir. The top Champagne is called Fût de Chêne and is an oak barrel-vinified 100% Chardonnay.
  • Triclot Père et Fils (RC)
  • Jean-Claude Verlet (RC)
  • Verlet-Lelarge (RC)

Comment: the list may be incomplete.

The church in Barbonne-Fayel. Picture linked from Wikimedia Commons (photo François Goglins, 2013).

Links

© Tomas Eriksson 2017, last update 2017-04-27

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