Champagne village profile: Festigny on the left bank of the Marne valley

Diagram Festigny 201506Key facts

Located in: Vallée de la Marne: Vallée de la Marne Rive Gauche
Vineyards and grape varieties: 191.3 hectares (472.7 acres), of which 87% Pinot Meunier, 7% Chardonnay, and 6% Pinot Noir.
Classification: “Autre cru” (84%)

Map

The map is linked from Wikimedia Commons, and the geographical information originates from OpenStreetMap. The dotted white area corresponds to the vineyards, light yellow is other open terrain, orange is built-up areas, and green indicates forest.

Neighbouring villages

North: Mareuil-le-Port
Northeast: Leuvrigny
Southeast: Saint-Martin-d’Ablois (part of Côteaux Sud d’Épernay)
Southwest: Igny-Comblizy
West: Nesle-le-Repons
Comment: more links will be added when profiles of the other villages have been uploaded.

The church in Festigny, Église Saint-Laurent. Picture linked from Wikimedia Commons (photo Nicole-christiane Paladini, 2012).

The village

Festigny is located on the left bank of the Marne river, which means south of the river, in a side valley formed by the stream Le Flagot and its tributaries.

Other than Festignyitself, the villages Le Mesnil-le-Huttier (also written Le Mesnil-Festigny), La Rue, and Neuville are also situated in the commune.

The Festigny commune covers 2563 hectares and has 400 inhabitants (as of 2012).

Vineyards

The vineyards in Festigny are located in the northern part of the commune, mostly around the village itself. The consist of slopes of varying directions on both banks of the stream Le Flagot as well as on the streams that are its tributaries: Ru Billet, Ru du Rognon, and Ruisseau de Fontenay. The vineyards are dominated by Pinot Meunier.

The current vineyard surface in the Festigny commune is 191.3 hectares (472.7 acres). There are 165.8 ha Pinot Meunier (86.7%), 14.1 ha Chardonnay (7.4%), and 11.2 ha Pinot Noir (5.9%). Numbers from CIVC, as of 2013. In 1997, the vineyard surface was 178 ha. There are 93 vineyard owners (exploitants) in the commune.

Champagne producers

Champagne growers

Producer status is indicated where known: RM = récoltant-manipulant, or grower-producers. RC = récoltant-coopérateur, growers that are cooperative members but sell Champagnes under their own name.

  • Berthelot-Piot (RM)
  • Bierry Père et Fils (RM)
  • Boonen-Meunier Fils (RM), has 8 ha vineyards.
  • Brochot-Huat
  • Gérard Callot-Demy (RM)
  • Fournier Thierry (RM), formerly written Fournier Th. on the labels, as well as Thierry Fourny on their website. Has 12 ha of vineyards.
  • Gaillard de Syran (RC)
  • J.P. Gaudinat Père et Fils (RC), has 12 ha of vineyards with 66% Pinot Meunier, 20% Chardonnay, and 14% Pinot Noir.
  • Gaudinat-Boivin (RM), has about 6 ha of vineyards in Festigny, Leuvrigny, and Œuilly.
  • Patrice Guay (RM), has 5 ha of vineyards with 70% Pinot Meunier, 25% Chardonnay, and 5% Pinot Noir. Also sells Champagnes under the brand:
    • Guay-Quignot
  • Lelarge-Ducrocq (RC)
  • Gérard Loriot (RM), has 7.5 ha of vineyards in Festigny (including Le Mesnil-le-Huttier) and Leuvrigny with 75% Pinot Meunier, 15% Chardonnay, and 10% Pinot Noir.
  • Michel Loriot (RM), a member of Vignerons Indépedants and Les Mains du Terroir with 7 ha vineyards with 80% Pinot Meunier, 18% Chardonnay, and 2% Pinot Noir. Music is played for the bottles while they rest in the cellar – vieillissement en musique. Monodie en Meunier Majeur Vieilles Vignes is a vintage Champagne, 100% Pinot Meunier from a vineyard planted in 1942.
  • Joseph Loriot-Pagel (RM), a member of Vignerons Indépedants (since 2000) and Generation Champagne, as well as a Special Club producer (since 2009). Has about 9 ha of vineyards in Festigny, Mareuil-le-Port, Nesles-le-Repons, Le Breuil, Avize, Cramant, and Oger with 66% Pinot Meunier, 20% Chardonnay, and 14% Pinot Noir. The annual production is 70-75 000 bottles. Their Special Club is a 100% Pinot Meunier from Festigny. The first vintage was 2009, and it was launched in 2014, then as the second 100% Pinot Meunier Special Club. (The first was Moussé Fils in Cuisles, in the 2005 vintage.) The next vintage will be 2012.
  • Christophe Mignon (RM), has 6.5 ha of vineyards from Le Breuil to Festigny with 90% Pinot Meunier, 5% Pinot Noir, and 5% Chardonnay. Works with biodynamical methods, but don’t seem to use that label themselves. Also sells Champagnes under the brand:
    • Eugène Prudhomme, also written E. Prudhomme
  • Munoz-Bruneau
  • Gaston Perrin (RM), has 5 ha of vineyards, all in Festigny, with 65% Pinot Meunier, 25% Chardonnay, and 10% Pinot Noir.
  • Piot-Lefèvre (RM)
  • Pompon-Champy
  • Roulot-Fournier (RM), has 8.5 ha vineyards in Festigny with a majority of Pinot Meunier.
  • Yannick Rousseaux (RM)
  • Trudon (RM), has a bit more than 7 ha of vineyards in Festigny with 90% Pinot Meunier, 9% Pinot Noir, and 1% Chardonnay, and an annual production of about 50 000 bottles.
  • Valli-Prévost (RC)
  • Vautrain-Perrin (RM)
  • Vély-Chartier Fils (RM), has 6 ha of vineyards with 85% Pinot Meunier.
  • Vergeat-Besnard (RM)

Comment: the list may not be complete.

Links

© Tomas Eriksson 2015

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Champagne village profile: Dormans on the left bank of the Marne valley

Diagram Dormans 201506Key facts

Located in: Vallée de la Marne: Vallée de la Marne Rive Gauche
Vineyards and grape varieties: 346.5 hectares (856.2 acres), of which 89% Pinot Meunier, 7% Pinot Noir, and 3.5% Chardonnay.
Classification: “Autre cru” (83%)

Map

The map is linked from Wikimedia Commons, and the geographical information originates from OpenStreetMap. The dotted white area corresponds to the vineyards, light yellow is other open terrain, orange is built-up areas, and green indicates forest. The dashed red line in the left-hand part of the map is the departmental border between Marne (where Dormans is located) and Aisne.

Neighbouring villages

On the right bank of Marne
Northeast: Verneuil (part of the Vallée de la Marne Rive Droite)
North: Vincelles (part of the Vallée de la Marne Rive Droite)
Northwest: Trelou-sur-Marne (part of the Terroir de Condé)

On the left bank of Marne
East: Troissy
Southeast: Igny-Comblizy
South: La Chapelle-Monthodon
West: Courthiézy (part of the Terroir de Condé)
Comment: more links will be added when profiles of the other villages have been uploaded.

The Marne river at Dormans. Picture from the bridge on the road D6/D18 between Dormans and Chassins/Trélou-sur-Marne. The camera is directed upstream. The silo in the middle of the picture is located near the railroad station in Dormans and the vineyards on the slope far to the left are located in Vincelles and Verneuil. Picture linked from Wikimedia Commons (foto Pline, 2012).

The village

Dormans is located on the left bank of the Marne river, which means south of the river. Dormans is the westernmost village counted as part of the area Vallée de la Marne Rive Gauche. Downstream (to the west), we move into Terroir de Condé.

Other than Dormans itself, located directly at the river, there are six other villages within the commune. Try is most distant from Dormans, to the eastnortheast, and the other five lay in a semicircle, a little closer: Vassieux to the eastnortheast, followed clockwise by Vassy, Champaillé, Chavenay, and finally Soilly to the southwest.

Château de Dormans is located in the village. A memorial of the battles at Marne during World War I – mémorial des batailles de la Marne – with a (large) chapel can be found close to the château.

The Dormans commune covers 2258 hectares and has 2855 inhabitants (as of 2012), referred to as dormanistes.

The church in Dormans. Picture linked from Wikimedia Commons (photo Zubro, 2002).

Vineyards

The vineyards in Dormans are spread over several parts of the commune and consist of mild slopes, including a large proportion of north-, northwest- and northeast-facing slopes. Pinot Meunier is the dominant grape variety.

The current vineyard surface in the Dormans commune is 346.5 hectares (856.2 acres). There are 309.5 ha Pinot Meunier (89.3%), 24.8 ha Pinot Noir (7.2%), and 12.2 ha Chardonnay (3.5%). Numbers from CIVC, as of 2013. In 1997, the vineyard surface was 313 ha. There are 143 vineyard owners (exploitants) in the commune.

Château de Dormans. Picture taken from the memorial of the battles at Marne during World War I. The vineyards in the distance are located on the other side of Marne, in Trelou-sur-Marne, and the buildings that can just be seen are the Chassins village. Picture linked from Wikimedia Commons (photo G.Garitan, 2014).

Champagne producers

Champagne growers

Producer status is indicated where known: RM = récoltant-manipulant, or grower-producers. RC = récoltant-coopérateur, growers that are cooperative members but sell Champagnes under their own name.

  • Jil Accariès (RC), has 15 ha of vineyards, of which 12 ha Pinot Meunier, 2 ha Chardonnay, and 1 ha Pinot Noir.
  • Yves Barbaray (RM), member of Vignerons Indépendants.
  • Betouzet-Brugneau (RC), has 12 ha of vineyards.
  • Francis Bourbonnois (RM)
  • Bression-Lourdeaux (RC), also writes B&L on the label.
  • Lucien Brion (RC), has slightly more than 4.5 ha of vineyards in Dormans (including Try), Troissy, and Verneuil with 60% Pinot Meunier, 30% Pinot Noir, and 10% Chardonnay.
  • Jean Bruneaux (RM)
  • Bruneaux-Thomas
  • Joël Coche (RM), has 8 ha of vineyards.
  • Convert-Lusquin (RC)
  • Christian Cougnet (RC), has 2 ha of vineyards.
  • Descôtes-Loyaux (RC)
  • Michel Dourland
  • Dubois-Lentendu (RC)
  • Didier Girault (RC)
  • Guiborat-Thognard
  • Jeandon Père & Fils (RC), has 8 ha of vineyards. Not to be confused with Jeandon-Privé in Champignol-lez-Mondeville.
  • Le Brun-Le Gouive (RM), has vineyards in Dormans, Monthelon, Grauves, and Bligny (in the Aube department).
  • Didier Lourdeaux (RM)
  • Lourdeaux-Pichelin (RC)
  • Roger Miguel (RC), also Roger Miguel & Fils.
  • Henri Palbrois (RC)
  • Guy Savart. Not to be confused with Savart in Écueil.

Comment: the list may not be complete.

Chapelle de Dormans, which is part of the World War I memorial. Picture linked from Wikimedia Commons (photo Jérôme Sautret, 2002).

Links

© Tomas Eriksson 2015

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Goisot – white wines from northwestern Burgundy

I recently tasted some white wines from Domaine Goisot, shown by Swedish-French online merchant Caviste. Goisot’s wines come from different appellations in the Grand Auxerrois, which is the area around Chablis in the northwestern part of Burgundy. Goisot is an organic and biodynamical producer, with a Demeter certification. This year Caviste showed two Chardonnays and one Sauvignon Blanc, but no Aligoté.

I missed out on these wines last year, but I did taste the Goisot wines shown by Caviste in 2013 and 2012, and wrote about them after the 2013 tasting. In that post I also wrote some  general information about the Grand Auxerrois.

Caviste Goisot 20150617

2013 Saint-Bris Exogyra Virgula
Grape variety: Sauvignon Blanc. One year on steel tanks.

Nose with apple, in particular green apple, peach, flowery notes and rather discrete Sauvignon notes. The palate is clearly dry, fruity with citrus, green apple, some Sauvignon notes, some mineral bitterness, and a high acidity. Definitely fresh, young but approachable now, 88 p.

The nose is almost a bit Riesling-like rather than filled with the green notes often shown by Sauvignon Blanc, and it shows some “deeper” fruit notes with stone fruits rather than just green apples and citrus. The explanation is that the grapes were harvested late, but the wine still has all the freshness it needs. I notice my previous notes from Goisot Saint-Bris wines also include perfume and “Riesling-like”, so this seems to be a consistent style. From my impressions of 2013 Burgundies so far, I wouldn’t say that a ripe style is particularly typical for the vintage.

2012 Bourgogne Côtes d’Auxerre Corps de Garde
Grape variety: Chardonnay. 18 months in oak barrels, of which 10% new.

Nose with yellow and green apples, some citrus, and some oak barrel notes with some butter and smoke. The palate is dry with green and yellow apples, some citrus, high acidity, minerality and good fruit character. Rather young, 88(+) p.

This wines reminds me of a Chablis with somewhat noticeable oak, but it is probably a bit more fruity than most of those wines, so it goes a bit in the direction of other Burgundies (Côte de Beaune) without losing the distinct impression of a cool origin.

The Corps de Garde range represents the non-vineyard designated terroir wines from Goisot, named after a watch tower at the domaine. The oak regime of this Chardonnay is the same as for the vineyard-desigated wines, but in this wine the oak and the buttery notes are more prominent.

2012 Bourgogne Côtes d’Auxerre Biaumont
Grape variety: Chardonnay. 18 months in oak barrels, of which 10% new.

Nose with yellow apples, hints of yellow plum, citrus, perfume, and flowery notes, as well as discrete oak barrel notes that are well integrated – definitely elegant! The palate is dry with citrus, green apple, noticeable minerality, and high acidity. Young, should preferably be cellared, 89+ p.

Here I was quite fond of the nose, and many Côte de Beaune wines at twice the price would come across as better having this nose, but the overall impression is more like a Chablis premier cru with well handled oak. Compared to the previous wine this is firmer on the palate with a more elegant nose, where the oak is better integrated, but it is not more full-bodied. It is definitely more in need of cellaring, and should at least get a few years of rest, but preferably more than that (say, 5+ years). The bottle I tasted from had been open for over four hours, and then came across as young but reasonably accessible. A couple of hours in a decanter in the fridge could be a good idea for those that can’t keep their fingers away this year or the next.

Biaumont is one of three vineyard-designated Goisot Chardonnay wines. The other two are Gondonne and Les Gueules de Loup. Of the three, Biaumont is supposed to be a bit more round and accessible as young, but the 2012 came across as more firm than Martin of Caviste had expected. On the other hand, the white 2012 Burgundies do tend to be more firm than the 2011s.

As a reference at the tasting (not available for purchased) we also got to taste:

2009 Bourgogne Côtes d’Auxerre Biaumont

The nose is flowery and perfumed with yellow and green apples, citrus, very well integrated oak barrel notes, and elegance. The palate is dry and rather fruity, a bit more full-bodied and round than the 2012s, with a high acidity and noticeable minerality. Rather young, but approachable now, 89 p.

This wine was served blind together with the information that it was one of previous three, but in another vintage. It was obvious that it was one of the Chardonnays, and since the oak notes came across in the same way, I guessed it was the Biaumont. The more fruity and round character indicated a more ripe vintage, so I guessed 2009, but the acidity was high enough (definitely good for a 2009!) for me to say 2010 as a back-up guess. When I check back, it turns out that I actually had tasted this wine before, in 2012. I then scored it 88+ p, and it reminded me of a Chablis premier cru.

Summing up

After having tasted three Caviste releases of Goisot, I must say that it is a very reliable producer. It is very pleasant that good Burgundy wines still can be had for a reasonable price, although the producer is consistently good and not entirely unknown. The explanation is that Goisot is located on the outskirts of Burgundy, and not in the most famous appellations. But if the wines are good and the producer reliable it’s just good that the wines come from places where an extra charges apply for the appellation name…

Swedish version here.

Posted in Burgundy, Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc | Leave a comment

Madeira from Barbeito

At the Portuguese wine day in Stockholm about a month ago, a single Madeira producer was present, namely Vinhos Barbeito. This is a high-class producer, and their wines are elegant i style as well as slightly lower in sweetness than other Madeira wines of the same category. This together with the high acidity gives them a nice freshness.

Unfortunately all sweet wines and fortified wines in general seem to be underrated wine types, which is a shame since they can offer marvelous aromas. Among wine geeks of “broad interest”, Madeira is primarily known for really old wines, often the oldest (still drinkable) wines that can be found. Unfortunately, this seems to have led to some of the younger versions dropping behind the radar of many wine-interested people. This is is shame since there is a lot of interesting Madeira that is not ancient Frasqueira, i.e., the classiscal vintage Madeira. Give the younger wines a try as well!

Barbeito 20150525

Wines tasted:

Barbeito Delvino Reserva Dry 5 Years Old
Grape varieties 80% Tinta Negra and 20% Sercial; residual sweetness approx. 45 g/l.

Nose with apricot, some caramel, some spice notes, honey, and some flowery notes. The palate is somewhat in the off-dry direction with good concentration, high acidity and therefore a lot of freshness, also caramel. 90 p

Note that “Dry” in connection with Madeira means something else than for other wines, i.e., more in the off-dry direction. Due to the quite high acidity typically shown by a Madeira, the perceived sweetness can be lower than the analytical value of the residual sweetness, and they can come across as “just barely off-dry”.

Barbeito Rainwater Madeira Reserva Medium Dry 5 Years Old
Grape varieties Tinta Negra and Verdelho.

Nose with caramel, some nuts (walnuts), some spice notes, and dried fruit. The palate is off-dry with dried fruit, some tropical fruit, spice notes, and good acidity. 88 p

Rainwater is supposed to be a lighter style of Madeira with e.g. a bit lower alcohol than the other versions. This doesn’t mean that any power is lacking in Barbeito’s version, which is shown by this wine also being poured in another corner of this wine fair, where Portuguese wine and food pairings where shown. In this case, it was dark chocolate with almond, and it worked excellent.

Barbeito Boal Reserva Velha 10 Years Old
Classified “medium sweet”.

Nose with nuts – walnuts and hazelnuts, caramel, dried fruit, a hint of honey, and discrete flowery notes. The palate is semi-sweet with a fresh bite from the acidity and powerful concentration, dried fruit, some spices notes, high acidity, and slight fiery notes. Good balance, more marked acidity than the 10 Year Old Malvasia, 92 p.

Barbeito Malvasia Reserva Velha 10 Years Old
Residual sweetness 106 g/l, classified “sweet”.

Nose with walnuts, some nut “peel”, dried fruit, caramel, spicy honey, and slightly flowery notes. The palate is sweet with powerful concentration, dried fruit, honey, spice notes, and an aftertaste with nuts, fruits and sweetness. 92 p

Barbeito Verdelho 1992 Frasqueira
Bottled in 2013

Nose with caramel, nuts, dried fruit, honey, some smoke, and a bit of flowery notes. A bit more weight and complexity in the nose than the 10 year olds. Off-dry to semi-sweet on the palate, powerful concentration, high acidity, and spice notes. 92 p.

Frasqueira is the classical type of vintage Madeira that must be over 20 years old when they are bottles, i.e., earliest the 21st year after harest. It is not uncommon for them to be bottled decades later than that.

Barbeito Malvasia 20 Years Old Ribeiro Real
85% Malvasia as well as 15% Tinta Negra from 1952, 1953, and 1954; residual sweetness 100 g/l

Nose with prominent spice notes, nuts (in particular walnuts), smoke notes, some dried fruit and classical notes of maturity. The palate is semi-sweet with noticeable spice, high acidity (quite a good acidity that provides freshness), nuts and dried fruit. 93 p.

Here, Barbeito has found a creative way to use the regulations to produce good and interesting wines. If one grape variety is indicated on the label, there must be at least 85% of that grape variety in the wine, according to common EU rules. In this case, the other 15% are used to “pimp” this wine with over 60 years old Tinta Negra wine, providing notes of maturity beyond what’s usually found in 20 year olds, together with the Malvasia character. Madeiras from this grape variety have so far not been allowed to be sold under their own varietal wines (but this will change this year).

Anyone interested in Madeira would be wise to check out Niklas Jörgensen’s blog Mad about Madeira. Niklas also lives in Stockholm, and during parts of the Portuguese wine day he took up station at the table of Barbeito and their Swedish importer Vinopia and helped out presenting and pouring the wines, with a great deal of enthusiasm.

Swedish version here.

Posted in Bual, Madeira, Malvasia, Verdelho | Leave a comment

Champagne village profile: Troissy on the left bank of the Marne valley

Diagram Troissy 201506Key facts

Located in: Vallée de la Marne: Vallée de la Marne Rive Gauche
Vineyards and grape varieties: 348.6 hectares (861.4 acres), of which 85% Pinot Meunier, 9% Pinot Noir, and 6.5% Chardonnay.
Classification: “Autre cru” (84%)

Map

The map is linked from Wikimedia Commons, and the geographical information originates from OpenStreetMap. The dotted white area corresponds to the vineyards, light yellow is other open terrain, orange is built-up areas, and green indicates forest.

Neighbouring villages

On the right bank of Marne
Northnortheast: Vandières (part of the Marne Rive Droite)
Northwest: Verneuil (part of the Marne Rive Droite)

On the left bank of Marne
East: Mareuil-le-Port
Southsoutheast: Nesle-le-Repons
Southsouthwest: Igny-Comblizy
West: Dormans
Comment: more links will be added when profiles of the other villages have been uploaded.

The church in Troissy, Église Saint-Martin. Picture linked from Wikimedia Commons (photo GO69, 2011).

The village

Troissy is located on the south bank of the Marne river, which means south of the river. Also the Bouquigny village, located to the west of the Troissy village, is part of the commune, and its name is sometimes seen written as Bouquigny-Troissy or Troissy-Bouquigny.

The Troissy commune covers 1546 hectares and has 854 inhabitants (as of 2012), referred to as troissyats and troissyates.

Vineyards

The vineyards in Troissy mostly consist of mild north-facing slopes with Pinot Meunier as the dominating grape variety.

The current vineyard surface in the Mareuil-le-Port commune is 348.6 hectares (861.4 acres). There are 295.8 ha Pinot Meunier (84.8%), 30.2 ha Pinot Noir (8.7%), and 22.6 ha Chardonnay (6.5%). Numbers from CIVC, as of 2013. In 1997, the vineyard surface was 303 ha. There are 104 vineyard owners (exploitants) in the commune.

Single vineyard sites

  • La Croix Joly, a vineyard with a mild northwestern slope. From this vineyard, Dehours et Fils in Mareuil-le-Port produces a vineyard-designated Champagne from old vine Pinot Meunier, as well as a red Coteaux Champenois (a still wine) from Pinot Meunier.

A vineyard in Troissy. Picture linked from Wikimedia Commons (photo Fab5669, 2013).

Champagne producers

Champagne growers

Producer status is indicated where known: RM = récoltant-manipulant, or grower-producers. RC = récoltant-coopérateur, growers that are cooperative members but sell Champagnes under their own name.

  • Jean-Marie Boland (RC)
  • Bracquemart & Fils
  • Chardonnier Yannick (RC)
  • Didier Charpentier (RM)
  • Yvan Charpentier (RM)
  • Régis Forest (RC)
  • Jean-Christophe Gratiaux, also an address in Mareuil-le-Port can be found.
  • Eric Jacquesson (RC)
  • Gilbert Jacquesson (RM), member of Vignerons Indépendants.
  • Paul Jobert (RC)
  • Joly-Champagne (RM), a member of Vignerons Indépendants who left cooperative membership in 1998. Has 12 ha of vineyards in five villages on both banks of the Vallée de la Marne.
  • Xavier Leconte (RM), has 10 ha of vineyards, member of Vignerons Indépedants.
  • Leconte-Agnus (RM), also written without a hyphen, member of Vignerons Indépedants.
  • Masse-Liébart & Fils
  • Jean-Louis Lourdeaux (RC)
  • Didier Mathelin (RM). Not to be confused with Mathelin in Mareuil-le-Port.
  • Hervé Mathelin (RM). Not to be confused with Mathelin inMareuil-le-Port.
  • Charles Orban (RM), with an annual production of 200 000 bottles.
  • Bernard Pottin (RC)
  • Joël Raymond (RC)
  • Raymond Vieillard (RC)

Comment: the list may not be complete.

Cooperatives

Links

© Tomas Eriksson 2015, last update 2015-07-04

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Champagne village profile: Olizy on the right bank of the Marne valley

Diagram Olizy 201506Key facts

Located in: Vallée de la Marne: Vallée de la Marne Rive Droite
Vineyards and grape varieties: 51.4 hectares (127.0 acres), of which 91.3% Pinot Meunier, 5.5% Pinot Noir, and 3.1% Chardonnay.
Classification: ”Autre cru” (84%)
Also called: Olizy-Violaine

Map

The map is linked from Wikimedia Commons, and the geographical information originates from OpenStreetMap. The dotted white area corresponds to the vineyards, light yellow is other open terrain, orange is built-up areas, and green indicates forest. The dashed red line in the left-hand part of the map is the departmental border between Marne (where Olizy is located) and Aisne.

Neighbouring villages

North and northeast: Romigny
Southeast: Jonquery
Southsoutheast: Cuisles
Comment: some of the villages visible on the map are located outside the Champagne appellation, and therefore don’t have any village profiles.

The church in Olizy, Église Saint-Rémi. Picture linked from Wikimedia Commons (photo Nicole-christiane Paladini, 2012).

The village

Olizy is located on the right bank of the Marne river, which means north of the river, but not directly at the Marne.

The Violaine village is also part of the commune, and is located close to the vineyards. In connection with Champagne it is common to see this village called Olizy-Violaine or Olizy-et-Violaine, but the official name of the commune is Olizy.

The Olizy commune covers 457 hectares and has 158 inhabitants (as of 2012) referred to as oliziens and oliziennes.

Vineyards

The vineyards in Olizy are located in the eastern part of the commune, mostly in a block continuous with the vineyards in Romigny and Jonquery. The consist of mild southwest- to south-facing slopes with Pinot Meunier as the dominant grape variety.

The current vineyard surface in the Olizy commune is 51.4 hectares (127.0 acres). There are 46.9 ha Pinot Meunier (91.3%), 2.8 ha Pinot Noir (5.5%), and 1.6 ha Chardonnay (3.1%). Numbers from CIVC, as of 2013. In 1997, the vineyard surface was 50 ha. There are 25 vineyard owners (exploitants) in the commune.

Champagne producers

Champagne growers

Producer status is indicated where known: RM = récoltant-manipulant, or grower-producers. RC = récoltant-coopérateur, growers that are cooperative members but sell Champagnes under their own name.

  • Luc Bétouzet (RM)
  • Chopin-Mimin
  • Erard-Salmon (RM), also J. Erard-Salmon
  • Heraut-Jubine
  • Gilbert Mimin (RM)
  • Mimin-Gougelet (RC)
  • Dominique Rigaut (RC)
  • Jean Rigaut (RC)
  • André Salmon (RC)
  • Jean-François Wurtz (RC)

Comment: the list may not be complete.

Links

© Tomas Eriksson 2015

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Champagne village profile: Passy-Grigny on the right bank of the Marne valley

Diagram Passy-Grigny 201506Key facts

Located in: Vallée de la Marne: Vallée de la Marne Rive Droite
Vineyards and grape varieties: 196.8 hectares (486.3 acres), of which 81% Pinot Meunier, 14% Pinot Noir, and 5% Chardonnay.
Classification: “Autre cru” (84%)
Noted for: home village of the Dom Caudron cooperative.

Map

The map is linked from Wikimedia Commons, and the geographical information originates from OpenStreetMap. The dotted white area corresponds to the vineyards, light yellow is other open terrain, orange is built-up areas, and green indicates forest. The dashed red line in the left-hand part of the map is the departmental border between Marne (where Passy-Grigny is located) and Aisne.

Neighbouring villages

North: Sainte-Gemme
Southwest: Vandières
South: Verneuil
West: Champvoisy
Comment: some of the village visible on the map are located outside the Champagne appellation, and therefore don’t have any village profiles.

The church in Passy-Grigny, Église Saint-Pierre et Saint-Paul. Picture linked from Wikimedia Commons (photo GO69, 2011).

The village

Passy-Grigny is located on the right bank of the Marne river, which means north of the river, but not directly at the Marne.

The Passy-Grigny commune covers 1199 hectares and has 385 inhabitants (as of 2012), referred to as passiats-grigniats and passiates-grigniates.

Vineyards

The vineyards in Passy-Grigny are located in several parts of the commune. In the northwestern part, north of the stream Ruisseau de Champvoisy, there is a block that is continuous with the vineyards in Champvoisy and Sainte-Gemme. To the west and southwest of the village there is a block that is continuous with the vineyards in the northern part of Verneuil. Finally, there are smaller blocks of vineyard in the western part of the commune (south of the Ruisseau de Champvoisy), east of the village, and in the southeastern part of the commune. The vineyards consist of mild slopes of different directions, including southeast-facing slopes, with Pinot Meunier as the most common grape variety.

The current vineyard surface in the Passy-Grigny commune is 196.8 hectares (486.3 acres). There are 159.5 ha Pinot Meunier (81.1%), 26.8 ha Pinot Noir (13.6%), and 10.5 ha Chardonnay (5.3%). Numbers from CIVC, as of 2013. In 1997, the vineyard surface was 185 ha. There are 62 vineyard owners (exploitants) in the commune.

Champagne producers

Champagne houses/négociants

The producer status NM = négociant-manipulant means that purchased grapes can be included in the Champagnes. NM producers can be anything from small producers that supplement their own grapes with some that they buy in, to large Champagne houses that primarily rely on purchased grapes. ND = négociant-distributeur, which means that they at least partly sell Champagnes produced by someone else, but under their own name.

  • Benjamin Rogge (ND), whose Champagnes are produced by Boizel in Épernay.

Champagne growers

Producer status is indicated where known: RM = récoltant-manipulant, or grower-producers. RC = récoltant-coopérateur, growers that are cooperative members but sell Champagnes under their own name.

  • Gilles Allait et Fils (RM)
  • Boizot-Delionnet (RC, Facebook page)
  • Maurice Caillot
  • Renée Caillot (RM), has just over 7 ha of vineyards in Passy-Grigny and Troissy.
  • Robert Caillot (RC), has 7 ha of vineyards.
  • Nobert Cez
  • Pascal Cez (RM, Facebook page)
  • Garnier-Causin (RC)
  • Marc Houelle (RC), has 6 ha of vineyards with 94% Pinot Meunier, 5% Pinot Noir, and 1% Chardonnay.
  • Laurent Laluc (RC)
  • Jean-Christophe Legendre, has about 10 ha of vineyards, mostly located on the right bank of the Vallée de la Marne.
  • Laurent Lequart (RC), has 9 ha of vineyards in Passy-Grigny and are members of village cooperative.
  • Christian Liébart (Facebook page)
  • Jean-Jacques Mahé (RC)
  • Jean-Michel Pelletier (RC)
  • Chantal Robion (RC)
  • Jacky Robion (RC)
  • Rogge-Cereser (RM), also written without a hyphen (Rogge Cereser), member of Vignerons Indépendants with 10 ha of vineyards and an annual production of 70 000 flaskor.
  • Thevenet-Delouvin, located in Passy-Grigny and Cersuil (Mareuil-le-Port) and uses oak barrels for parts of their range.

Comment: the list may not be complete.

Cooperatives

  • Coopérative Vinicole de Passy-Grigny is a cooperative that uses the brand Dom Caudron for their Champagnes. The cooperative was founded in 1929 by 23 growers (then with a total of 12 ha) after being urged to do so by the priest Aimé Caudron. Today, there are 75 member with a total of 130 ha of vineyards in the Marne valley. Pinot Meunier dominate in these vineyard holdings (about 80%), and several Dom Caudron Champagnes consist of 100% Pinot Meunier. In some of the cuvées there is also Chardonnay. Small oak barrels are used for some of the cuvées. Their most ambitious Pinot Meunier Champagne is called Cornalyne and 50% of its base is vinified in oak. The cooperative puts a lot of effort into offering visits and various forms of tours, and also has a museum with old winemaking equipment. A general presentation can be found in the video below:

Links

© Tomas Eriksson 2015

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