Mixed news including several Burgundies

A couple of weeks ago, the Stockholm branch of the wine tasting club Munskänkarna held a tasting of news in the range of the Swedish alcohol monopoly. Although I sometimes lead tastings in Munskänkarna, I was not guilty of choosing the wines for this tasting. This was a “do it in your own pace” tasting, where pairs of wine are meant to be tasted together.

White Burgundies

IMG_11862013 Mâcon-Milly-Lamartine “Clos du Four”, Domaine Cordier Père et Fils
Grape variety: Chardonnay.

Nose: Citrus, some white flowers, slightly chalky minerality, discrete herbaceous notes. A fruity nose that gives a rather elegant impression next to the wine below.
Palate: Citrus together with some green and yellow apples, rather good concentration with some viscosity, definitely high acidity, some mineral, and a citrus-dominated aftertaste with a hint of grapefruit bitterness.
Summary: Fresh and good, young but approachable now, could probably gain from some cellaring, 88(+) p.

The white wines from the South of Burgundy, Maconnais, have been improving in quality and recognition for many years, but the prices remain reasonable. In my opinion, this wine shows the style that I think this area does best, white wines where the oak component and buttery notes are kept reasonable. The result is often a wine that comes across as something in-between white Côte de Beaune wines and those from Chablis.

2013 Bourgogne Blanc, Henri Boillot
Grape variety: Chardonnay.

Nose: yellow apples, some yellow plums, butter, spice notes and toasted oak. Classical White Burgundy nose with noticeable oak, perhaps a bit too noticeable.
Palate: yellow apples, some citrus, prominent minerality, spices, some viscosity, high acidity, apply aftertaste with some grapefruit bitterness and spice notes.
Summary: the palate is definitely more finely nuanced than the nose, with a lot more minerality than the wine above. Definitely powerful for a basic Bourgogne Blanc (but on the other hand also more expensive than many other such wines). Could possibly gain from some cellaring, 88-89 p.

Here, I wouldn’t have minded to combine the nose of the Mâcon with the palate of the Boillot…

Rosé

2014 IMG_1188Langhe Rosato, Josetta Saffirio
Piemonte, grape variety: Nebbiolo.

Medium pink colour.
Nose: candy-styled notes and wild strawberries, regular strawberries, and mixed fruit candy including raspberry gum drops. Accessible and a bit “simple” nose.
Palate: fruity attack, decent concentration of fruit, some viscosity, mineral notes that emerge mid-palate and then are replaced by an increasing bitterness that remain in the aftertaste.
Summary: good foody style and some conciliatory character mid-palate, between the simple nose and the bitter aftertaste, but not my style. 80 p? and then I feel rather generous in my scoring, due to the wine’s concentration and foody character.

2013 Château Routas Rouvière Rosé
Côteaux Varois en Provence, grape varieties: 45% Cinsault, 35% Grenache, and 20% Syrah.

Light pink colour.
Nose: rather fruity with wild strawberries, regular strabwberries, some citrus, and discrete minerality. A rather classical Provence rosé nose.
Palate: dry with wild strawberries, red apples, some citrus, minerality, good acidity and a fresh aftertaste with mineral and hints of foody bitterness.
Summary: pleasant and classical Provence rosé, although not a heavyweight, 87 p.

Red

IMG_11892013 Crozes-Hermitage, Domaine des Lises
Northern Rhône, grape variety: Syrah.

Nose: blackberries and dark cherries, violets, some liquorice, slightly smoky, and discrete pepper notes. Classical Crozes notes in the fruity and carefully oaked style. Palate: medium body with blackcurrants, barely medium concentrated fruit, decent acidity, some pepper, rather prominent tannins.
Summary: a bit in the lean direction with respect to the fruit, with a tougher palate than the nose indicates, would probably gain from some cellaring. 86 p

Domaine des Lises is run by Maxime Graillot, son of Alain Graillot. Compared to Graillot Senior, the wines of Maxime are usually a bit lighter, more elegant and “pure”, since he usually destems the grapes and be more careful with new oak.

2013 Jim Barry Lodge Hill Shiraz
Clare Valley, South Australia.

Nose: blackberries, black currants, some red berries, pepper, salty liquorice, well integrated oak, slightly flowery. Nose with some elegance, and indicates power but still elegance.
Palate: a bit more than medium bodied with blackberries, rather good concentration of fruit, a hint of sweetness of berries, some pepper, rather powerful tannins that are still embedded in the fruit, aftertaste with berries and tannins.
Summary: approachable now for those that are not scared of tannins, but could still gain from cellaring. 88 p.

IMG_11902010 Le Cigare Volant
Central Coast, California, grape varieties: 28% Syrah, 22% Grenache, 17% Cinsault, 17% Mourvèdre, and 16% Carignan.

Nose: elegant red berry-dominated nose with strawberries, red currants, a hint of orange zest and slightly flowery notes, discrete minerality, and spices.
Palate: medium body, fresh with red currants and some cranberries, good concentration of fruit, good acidity that contributes to the freshness, slightly spicy, rather mild and well embedded tannins, and an aftertaste of red currants and cranberries together with some tannin.
Summary: rather elegant and already nuanced, less alcohol feeling than in many Châteauneufs, pleasant drinkability, 90 p.

This is something of a Châteauneuf-du-Pape copy from the “Rhône Ranger” producer Bonny Doon. Cigare volant, “flying cigar”, is the French term for flying saucer. The reason for this choice of name is that the original appellation regulations of Châteauneuf-du-Pape included a rule that cigares volants weren’t allowed to land in the vineyards.

2012 Domaine de Villeneuve Les Vieilles Vignes
Châteauneuf-du-Pape, Southern Rhône, grape varieties: 70% Grenache, 16% Mourvèdre, 8% Syrah, 4% Cinsault, and 2% Clairette.

Nose: red berry-dominated with strawberries and lingonberries and a hint of dark berries, spice notes with some herbs and some oak, slightly flowery.
Palate: a bit more than medium body, mostly fruity with lingonberries, spice notes including pepper, fresh acidity, some tannins, and a berry-dominated aftertaste with some tannins.
Summary: goes in the berry-dominated and fruity direction with a palate with fine balance, originating from the fresh acidity. Comes across as a bit more powerful than the previous wine, but neither here does the alcohol make itself too much reminded. 89-90 p.

Pleasant with a balanced Châteauneuf, and here I think that the vintage may have played a role. 2012 is a cool Rhône vintage, which means good acidity and better conditions for balanced and elegant southern Rhône wines.

IMG_11912009 Brunello di Montalcino, Fattoria La Gerla
Tuscany, grape variety: Sangiovese.

Light to medium red colour with brick-coloured edge, lighter than the next wine.
Nose: red berries including lingonberries, sweet berry notes (that gives a slightly warm impression), spices, slightly developed notes with black tea, hints of leather, and slightly flowery notes.
Palate: red berries and lingonberries and cranberries, good acidity, some cranberry bitterness, some sweetness of berries, spice notes, medium tannins, aftertaste with berries together with spice notes and a hint of oak.
Summary: some hot vintage character but good balance, but well handled oak, i.e., they are hardly noticeable. Approachable now, can be cellared more by those who prefer developed notes, 89 p.

2010 Brunello di Montalcino, Casanova di Neri
Tuscany, grape variety Sangiovese.

Medium red colour, clear.
Nose: red berries including lingonberries, a hint of sweet berry notes, spices, and noticeable oak.
Palate: red berries including cranberries, rather noticeable cranberry bitterness, spices, prominent and slightly tough tannins, aftertaste with berries and noticeable tannins of which some seems to be oak tannins.
Summary: rather tough at present, could probably develop, 88(+) p?

Three red 2012s from Burgundy

These were the so-called extra wines that could be tasted at an extra cost. Two of them had been released some time ago, although this was a tasting of news.

IMG_1192

2012 Volnay, Domaine Michel Lafarge

Nose: elegant with strawberries, orange zest, minerality, slightly flowery, spices, and discrete and well integrated notes of stalks and oak.
Palate: strawberries, noticeable minerality, high acidity with somewhat tart mid-palate and finish, some tannins, and a berry-dominated aftertaste with some tannins.
Summary: elegant but classical style although rather young, could develop with cellaring, 89(+) p.

All three wines originate from good smaller producers, but Lafarge is the highest regarded of these and features on many lists of the best producers of Burgundy. This reputation means that also a village Volnay from the producer is a bit more expensive than what such wines costed not too long ago. The wine style of Lafarge is usually described as traditional, which e.g. means that (some) stalks are included, and that the wines are not adapted to be easily accessible when young. At the same time, the basic style of Volnay is elegant and smooth, so the final result is not a “difficult” wine.

2o12 Nuits-Saint-Georges Vieilles Vignes, Domaine Robert Chevillon

Nose: berry-dominated and elegant nose with ripe strawberries, some orange zest, spice notes and well integrated oak, and slightly flowery. Slightly heavier nose than the previous wine.
Palate: strawberries, rather noticeable spice notes, good acidity, some minerality, rather prominent tannins, berry-dominated aftertaste with some tannins.
Summary: rather polished for a Nuits-Saint-Georges, but tougher than the 2010 (see below), could develop, 90 p.

By pure coincidence, I had uncorked a 2010 of the same wine in the comfort of my own home the previous day. According to my Cellartracker note, this was my impression of the wine:

2010 Nuits-Saint-Georges Vieilles Vignes, Domaine Robert Chevillon

Clear light red colour. Elegant nose with strawberries, some orange zest, a hint of stalky notes (i.e., a tiny bit green, but in a pleasant way), some spice, well handled oak, some flowery notes. Medium minus body with a lot of smoothness to it, notes of strawberries and cranberries, pronounced minerality, fine acidity, just a bit of spice (including pepper) and tannins, aftertaste with cranberries and mineral. Young but approachable now, developed with aeration som will surely develop with time in the cellar, 89-90(+) p.

This wine definitely shows an unusually elegant side of Nuits-Saint-Georges.

2012 Gevrey-Chambertin Les Cazetiers Premier Cru, Marchand-Tawse

Nose: spicy impression with rather ripe cherries, mixed spices, hints of undergrowth, and well integrated oak. A notch more powerful and dark than the previous two 2012s.
Palate: ripe strawberries, some cherries, some hints of both sweet berries and some cranberry bitterness, minerality, good acidity, some tannins of a definitely smooth character, and a berry-dominated aftertaste with minerality.
Summary: clearly elegant, polished character, actually approachable now but could without doubt develop more, 91 (+) p.

Marchard-Tawse is a rather new producer under this name, and is a smaller négociant with some vineyards of their own. After having e.g. worked as winemaker at Vougeraie, in 2006 Pascal Marchand started a négociant business under his own name. In 2010 he paired with financier Morey Tawse, who made it possible to buy Domaine Maume (with 4 ha/10 acres) in Gevrey-Chambertin in 2011. The name was familiar, but this was the first wine from them I’ve tasted, and it was definitely a promising encounter!

Summing up the 2012s

These 2012s all show a style that I also connect with red Burgundies from the top vintage 2010, i.e., elegance, good fruit but not excessive maturity, and fresh acidity. Summing up my impressions, I still consider 2010 as slightly better, but today 2012s are likely to come by… I’ve liked the red 2012s from our first encounter, but my initial impressions was that they had slightly sweeter and more ripe fruit than the 2010s, i.e., that they were something in-between 2009 and 2010 in style (but perhaps not quite at the level of these vintages). Later impressions, including this tasting, have often been more in the 2010 direction when it comes to style.

Posted in 2012, Burgundy, California, Chardonnay, Grenache, Munskänkarna, Nebbiolo, Piedmont, Pinot Noir, Rosé, Sangiovese, South Australia, Syrah, Tuscany | Leave a comment

Champagne village profile: Cuisles on the right bank of the Marne valley

Diagram Cuisles 201505Key facts

Located in: Vallée de la Marne: Vallée de la Marne Rive Droite
Vineyards and grape varieties: 33.0 hectares (81.5 acres), of which 76% Pinot Meunier, 16% Pinot Noir, and 8% Chardonnay.
Classification: ”Autre cru” (86%)

Map

The map is linked from Wikimedia Commons, and the geographical information originates from OpenStreetMap. The dotted white area corresponds to the vineyards, light yellow is other open terrain, orange is built-up areas, and green indicates forest.

Neighbouring villages

Northnortheast: Jonquery
Southeast and south: Baslieux-sous-Châtillon
Southwest: Châtillon-sur-Marne
Northnorthwest: Olizy
Comment 1: the neighbouring village Anthenay is not part of the Champagne appellation and doesn’t have a village profile.
Comment 2: more links will be added when profiles of the other villages have been uploaded.

The village

Cuisles is located on the right bank of the Marne river, which means north of the river. The village is located in a side valley along the stream Ru de Jonquery, which empties into Ru de Belval just south of Cuisles.

The Cuisles commune covers 277 hectares and has 142 inhabitants (as of 2012).

1973-2006 Cuisles was a part of Châtillon-sur-Marne commune, their larger neighbour, but since 1 March 2006 they are again a commune of their own. This change should have increased the number of Champagne villages (or more precisely put the number of communes that are part of the zone de production of Champagne, where the villages can be located) from 318 till 319.

Vineyards

The vineyards in Cuisles are located to the west of the village and consist of mild east- to southeast-facing slopes that are dominated by Pinot Meunier.

The current vineyard surface in the Cuisles commune is 33.0 hectares (81.5 acres). There are 25.1 ha Pinot Meunier (76%), 5.2 ha Pinot Noir (16%), and 2.7 ha Chardonnay (8%). Numbers from CIVC, as of 2013. The combined vineyard area of Cuisles and Châtillon-sur-Marne has increased from 257 ha in 1997 to 272 ha in 2013. There are 34 vineyard owners (exploitants) in the Cuisles commune.

Champagne producers

Champagne houses/négociants

The producer status NM = négociant-manipulant means that purchased grapes can be included in the Champagnes. NM producers can be anything from small producers that supplement their own grapes with some that they buy in, to large Champagne houses that primarily rely on purchased grapes.

  • Sébastien Pascal (NM), also called Château de Cuisles for the château where the producer is located. This building was purchased in March 2000 by the wine growing family Pascal Delette. The family vineyards are spread over 14 villages.

Champagne growers

Producer status is indicated where known: RM = récoltant-manipulant, or grower-producers. RC = récoltant-coopérateur, growers that are cooperative members but sell Champagnes under their own name.

  • Emilien Fresne (RM)
  • Froment Assailly
  • Heucq Père & Fils (RM), member of Vignerons Indépendants with 6 ha vineyards, mainly in Cuisles. Today (2015) led by André Heucq.
  • J. Lécurieux (RC)
  • Moussé Fils (RM), a Special Club producer with 5.6 ha of vineyards in Cuisles, Jonquery, Châtillon-sur-Marne, and Vandières with 85% Pinot Meunier (which is the focus of this producer), 12% Pinot Noir, and 3% Chardonnay. The annual production is about 50 000 bottles and they have produced their own Champagnes since 1923. With the exception of a blanc de blancs named Opale, the proportion of Pinot Meunier in the cuvées is 80%-100%, and their slogan is Profondément Meunier. They produce the only Special Club which is 100% Pinot Meunier. (José Michel is known for Pinot Meunier but their Special Club is 50% Pinot Meunier and 50% Chardonnay.) I believe 2005 to be the first vintage (the same year they became members of the club), and it has then been followed by 2006, 2008, and 2009. The 2011 vintage is launched in July 2015. In the video below, Cédric Moussé gives a general presentation of the 2014 vintage:

  • Lucien Orban (RM)
  • Schreiner (RM), also Jean-Pierre Schreiner.

Comment: the list may not be complete.

Links

© Tomas Eriksson 2015

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Champagne village profile: Jonquery on the right bank of the Marne valley

Diagram Jonquery 201505Key facts

Located in: Vallée de la Marne: Vallée de la Marne Rive Droite
Vineyards and grape varieties: 42.8 hectares (105.8 acres), of which 78% Pinot Meunier, 14% Pinot Noir, and 8% Chardonnay.
Classification: ”Autre cru” (84%)

Map

The map is linked from Wikimedia Commons, and the geographical information originates from OpenStreetMap. The dotted white area corresponds to the vineyards, light yellow is other open terrain, orange is built-up areas, and green indicates forest.

Neighbouring villages

Northnortheast: Ville-en-Tardenois
Eastnortheast: Champlat-et-Beaujacourt
East: La Neuville-aux-Larris
Southeast: Baslieux-sous-Châtillon
South: Cuisles
Southwest and west: Olizy
Northwest: Romigny
Comment: more links will be added when profiles of the other villages have been uploaded.

The church in Jonquery, Église Saint-Martin. Picture linked from Wikimedia Commons (photo Nicole-christiane Paladini, 2012).

The village

Jonquery is located on the right bank of the Marne river, which means north of the river. The village is located in a side valley along the stream Ru de Jonquery.

The Jonquery commune covers 434 hectares and has 106 inhabitants (as of 2012).

Vineyards

The vineyards in Jonquery are located southwest of the village in a block continuous with the vineyards in the neighbouring commune, Olizy. Those in Jonquery consist of mild eastnortheast- to south-facing slopes with Pinot Meunier as the dominating grape variety.

The current vineyard surface in the Jonquery commune is 42.8 hectares (105.8 acres). There are 33.2 ha Pinot Meunier (77.6%), 6 ha Pinot Noir (14.1%), and 3.5 ha Chardonnay (8.3%). Numbers from CIVC, as of 2013. In 1997, the vineyard surface was also 43 ha. There are 9 vineyard owners (exploitants) in the commune.

Champagne producers

Champagne growers

Producer status is indicated where known: RM = récoltant-manipulant, or grower-producers. RC = récoltant-coopérateur, growers that are cooperative members but sell Champagnes under their own name.

  • Gaëtane, which has owners with the surname Perignon.
  • Auguste Huiban (RM), run by Isabelle and Eric Ammeux since 1991. See also Paul Augustin below.
  • Paul Augustin (RM) belongs together with Auguste Huiban above. The Champagnes consist partly or entirely of grapes from vineyards in Fontaine-sur-Aÿ that are owned since 2005, which led to this brand being added, named for the two sons Paul-Louis and Auguste.
  • Poudras-Thibaut (RM)

Comment: It is not certain that the list is complete.

Links

© Tomas Eriksson 2015, last update 2015-05-24

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Mixed wines

A couple of weeks ago the French-Swedish online wine dealer Franska vinlistan (“French wine list”) put on a tasting of mixed wines from their range. Here my impressions of some of the wines.

Chartogne-Taillet Cuvée Sainte Anne baksida 201504

I like when the back label of Champagne bottles, in particular non-vintage cuvées, specifies what’s actually in the bottle. In part because I’m curious, in part because it makes it possible to identify extra good batches, and in part because I like to save bottles to drink them with some age, and therefore need to identify how old they are. This is one of the most informative back labels I’ve seen!

Chartogne-Taillet Cuvée Sainte Anne
Champagne, 50% Pinot Noir and 50% Chardonnay. Base vintage 2012 (55%), reserve wine from 2011 and 2010 (45%), dosage 4,5 g/l, i.e., basically an Extra Brut.

Nose with ripe yellow fruit, apples, some white currants, slightly bready and nutty. Fruity palate with yellow and green apples, citrus, good acidity, and mineral. A Pinot Noir nose with “small grower character” but more of a Chardonnay palate with no obvious red notes. Rather young, but approachable now, 88 p.

Definitely serious and rather firm for an “entry cuvée”, but then we’re talking about a producer with a good reputation. Chartogne-Taillet is one of the new generation of small growers in Champagne, and is located in the village Merfy in the northwestern outskirts of Champagne. Cuvée Sainte Anne is the non-vintage “village cuvée” of the range. In my village profile of Merfy I’ve written a bit more about Chartogne-Taillet.

2014 Château Pégau Cuvée Lône
Côtes-du-Rhône blanc, grape varieties 40% Clairette, 30% Bourboulenc, 20% Grenache Blanc, 10% Ugni Blanc.

Discrete fruity nose with citrus, slightly flowery and perfumed. Fruity palate, slightly viscous impression, foody with a slight bitterness, medium acidity, some chalky minerality, and a fruity aftertaste. 85 p?

Rather lean for a white Rhône wine, i.e., not as oily as some other. Château Pégau is the second wine of Châteauneuf-du-Pape produces Domaine Pégau.

2013 Domaine Joseph Balland-Chapuis Sancerre Le Chatillet
Loire, grape variety Sauvignon Blanc.

Nose with citrus, apples, gooseberries, some typical varietal green and grassy notes, hints of honey and tropical fruit. Palate with citrus and green apple, high acidity, some mineral, aftertaste with fruitiness, citrus and green apples and a firm finish. The nose is rather fruity and “generous” for a  Sancerre (it could have belonged to a Sauvignon Blanc from a warmer place), but on the palate the wine is more firm and classical. Drinks well now, 87 p.

Apparently this was the last vintage from this producer in this form, due to a break-up to several owners.

2014 Domaine Petit Barabas Côtes du Rhône Rosé
Grape varieties Grenache and Carignan.

Definitely a pale pink colour. A rather typical “Provence rosé nose” with wild strawberries, minerality, and some flowery notes. The palate is distinctly dry, foody with a light bitterness, minerality, good acidity, and an aftertaste with mineral. 85-86 p

This rosé reminded me a bit more of a Provence rosé (which it isn’t) than typical southern Rhône rosés, that typically have a little deeper colour and can be a bit more on the fruity side.

I mitten och till höger de två röda som nämns nedan, i sällskap med några andra flaskor.

In the middle and to the right the two reds mentioned below, in the company of some other bottles.

2011 Marabino Noto
DOC Noto Rosso, Sicily, grape variety Nero d’Avola.

Quite dark and powerful nose with blackberries, tar, some smoke, spice botes, animal notes with some barnyard aromas (which in a red wine is usually a lot more pleasant than what it may sound like…). Fruity palate with sweetish attack of ripe red berries, high acidity, some tannins, and a good aftertaste. Not quite as tough on the palate as the nose indicates, so rather approachable now. 86-87 p.

2012 Domaine du Pégau Châteauneuf-du-Pape Cuvée Réservée Rouge 2012
South Rhône, 85% Grenache, 9% Syrah, and other grape varieties.

Definitely an elegant nose with ripe red berries including red currants and strawberries, flowery and discrete herbaceous notes, well integrated oak, and mineral. Palate with good concentration, ripe red berries, rather prominent tannins, spice notes, stony minerality, flowery notes that can be noted also on the palate, and a tannic aftertaste. Elegant profile, young, 91-92(+) p.

2012 is a rather cool vintage in the Rhône wine region, and I think this shows in the style of this wine, that goes more in the elegant direction than the average vintage does. Something that contributes to this impression is that I pleasantly enough didn’t note any fiery alcoholic character.

Swedish version here.

Posted in Champagne, Grenache, Loire, Nero d'Avola, Rhône, Sauvignon Blanc, Sicily | Leave a comment

Champagne village profile: Baslieux-sous-Châtillon on the right bank of the Marne valley

Baslieux-sous-Châtillon 201505Key facts

Located in: Vallée de la Marne: Vallée de la Marne Rive Droite
Vineyards and grape varieties: 78.1 hectares (193.0 acres), of which 74% Pinot Meunier, 17% Pinot Noir, and 9% Chardonnay.
Classification: ”Autre cru” (84%)

Map

The map is linked from Wikimedia Commons, and the geographical information originates from OpenStreetMap. The dotted white area corresponds to the vineyards, light yellow is other open terrain, orange is built-up areas, and green indicates forest.

Neighbouring villages

North: Jonquery
Northeast: La Neuville-aux-Larris
Eastnortheast: Cuchery
South: Villers-sous-Châtillon
Southwest: Châtillon-sur-Marne
Westnorthwest: Cuisles
Comment: more links will be added when profiles of the other villages have been uploaded.

The village

Baslieux-sous-Châtillon is located on the right bank of the Marne river, which means north of the river. The village is located in a curved side valley formed by the stream Ru de Belval.

The Baslieux-sous-Châtillon commune covers 588 hectares and has 178 inhabitants (as of 2012), referred to as baslieutains and baslieutaines.

Vineyards

The vineyards in Baslieux-sous-Châtillon are primarily located in the northern part of the commune and consist of mild south- to southeast-facing slopes. A smaller part is located in the southern part of the commune and consists of mild north- to northwest-facing slopes. Pinot Meunier is the dominant grape variety.

The current vineyard surface in the Baslieux-sous-Châtillon commune is 78.1 hectares (193.0 acres). There are 57.4 ha Pinot Meunier (73.5%), 13.5 ha Pinot Noir (17.3%), and 7.2 ha Chardonnay (9.3%). Numbers from CIVC, as of 2013. In 1997, the vineyard surface was also 78 ha. There are 34 vineyard owners (exploitants) in the commune.

Champagne producers

Champagne houses/négociants

The producer status NM = négociant-manipulant means that purchased grapes can be included in the Champagnes. NM producers can be anything from small producers that supplement their own grapes with some that they buy in, to large Champagne houses that primarily rely on purchased grapes.

  • Eric Taillet (NM), has 5.7 ha of vineyards in six villages around Basileux-sous-Châtillon.

Champagne growers

Producer status is indicated where known: RM = récoltant-manipulant, or grower-producers. RC = récoltant-coopérateur, growers that are cooperative members but sell Champagnes under their own name.

  • Annie Bertrand (RM)
  • Billard-Girardin
  • Chauvet-Devaquier (RC)
  • Joël Chevillet (RM)
  • Devaquier-Deguay (RC)
  • Robert Faivre
  • Liébart-Régnier (RM?), member of Vignerons Indépendants with 9 ha of vineyards in Baslieux-sous-Châtillon and Vauciennes.
  • Mathieu-Gandon (RM)
  • Mathieu-Gosztyla (RM), has 5 ha of vineyards in four villages with 40% Pinot Noir, 40% Pinot Meunier, and 20% Chardonnay.
  • Franck Pascal (RM), member of Vignerons Indépendants. A biodynamic producer with 4.2 ha of vineyards in five villages in the Vallée de la Marne, with 79% Pinot Meunier, 12% Pinot Noir, and 9% Chardonnay (the proportions vary somewhat between sources). Got attention in 2005 from e.g. Gault Millau as one of the best “up and coming” among the new generation of grower-producers.
  • Pascal-Delette (RM), also written Pascal-Delette & fils, has 7 ha of vineyards.
  • C. Pascal-Poudras (RM)
  • Guy Remi (RC)
  • Rigot et Fils, has 3 ha of vineyards.
  • Rouillère fils (RM), has 4.4 ha of vineyards.
  • Roland Vizeneux & Fils (RC)

Comment: the list may not be complete.

Links

© Tomas Eriksson 2015, last update 2015-05-24

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Champagne village profile: Cuchery on the right bank of the Marne valley

Diagram Cuchery 201505Key facts

Located in: Vallée de la Marne: Vallée de la Marne Rive Droite
Vineyards and grape varieties: 142.2 hectares (351.4 acres), of which 81% Pinot Meunier, 13% Pinot Noir, and 7% Chardonnay.
Classification: ”Autre cru” (84%)

Map

The map is linked from Wikimedia Commons, and the geographical information originates from OpenStreetMap. The dotted white area corresponds to the vineyards, light yellow is other open terrain, orange is built-up areas, and green indicates forest.

Neighbouring villages

North and northeast: La Neuville-aux-Larris
East and southeast: Belval-sous-Châtillon
Southsouthwest: Villers-sous-Châtillon
West: Baslieux-sous-Châtillon

The town hall (mairie) of Cuchery with a small part of the church visible in the background. Picture linked form Wikimedia Commons (photo G.Garitan, 2014).

The village

Cuchery is located on the right bank of the Marne river, which means north of the river. The village is located in a curved side valley formed by the stream Ru de Belval.

The Cuchery commune covers 703 hectares and has 434 inhabitants (as of 2012), referred to as cucheriats and cucheriates.

Vineyards

The vineyards in Cuchery are located both north and south/southeast of the village, and are dominated by Pinot Meunier. Those to the north are part of a block located in a south- to southwest-facing slope where the upper vineyards are located in La Neuville-aux-Larris and the eastern part is located in Belval-sous-Châtillon. Those to the south/southeast consist of mild south-facing slopes.

The current vineyard surface in the Cuchery commune is 142.2 hectares (351.4 acres). There are 114.9 ha Pinot Meunier (80.8%), 17.7 ha Pinot Noir (12.5%), and 9.6 ha Chardonnay (6.7%). Numbers from CIVC, as of 2013. In 1997, the vineyard surface was 140 ha. There are 102 vineyard owners (exploitants) in the commune.

Champagne producers

Champagne houses/négociants

The producer status NM = négociant-manipulant means that purchased grapes can be included in the Champagnes. NM producers can be anything from small producers that supplement their own grapes with some that they buy in, to large Champagne houses that primarily rely on purchased grapes.

  • Michel Dervin (NM), a Champagne house founded in 1983. Second-hand information from approximately 2012 talks of 7.8 ha vineyards and an annual production of 60 000 bottles. The wines don’t go through malolactic fermentation.

Champagne growers

Producer status is indicated where known: RM = récoltant-manipulant, or grower-producers. RC = récoltant-coopérateur, growers that are cooperative members but sell Champagnes under their own name.

  • Beurton-Vincent (RC) or G. Beurton-Vincent, has 8 ha of vineyards in Cuchery and Baslieux-sous-Châtillon.
  • Denis Bonningre (RC)
  • Damien Brugneau
  • Gilbert Charbonnier (RM), has at least earlier sold specially labelled bottles namned for songs performed by Johnny Hallyday, “the French Elvis”.
  • Chaumuzart-Gé (RC)
  • Claude Férat (RC)
  • A. Levasseur (RM) or Albert Levasseur, a producer that since 2003 are run by David Levasseur. Has 4.2 ha of vineyards in Cuchery, Châtillon-sur-Marne, and Fleury-la-Rivière.
  • Mancier (RM), alternatively Claude Mancier or Florence Mancier, with the latter currently running the producer.
  • Arnaud Marlé (RM, alternative website), has 2.14 ha of vineyards in Cuchery and Venteuil.
  • Moreau-Billard (RM)
  • Poissinet (RM) or Poissinet & Fils, earlier called Poissinet-Ascas (and still found on some bottles), member of Vignerons Indépendants. The first bottles under the label Poissinet-Ascas were produced in 1974.
  • Claude Quénot (RM)
  • Ch. Remy (RM), where Ch should be read Christian. Has since 1982 changed status from RC to RM.

Comment: the list may not be complete.

Cooperatives

  • Coopérative Vinicole Cuchery is a cooperative in Cuchery. No information about number of members and so on.

Links

© Tomas Eriksson 2015, last update 2015-05-18

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Champagne village profile: La Neuville-aux-Larris on the right bank of the Marne valley

Diagram La Neuville-aux-Larris 201504Key facts

Located in: Vallée de la Marne: Vallée de la Marne Rive Droite
Vineyards and grape varieties: 6.9 hectares (17.1 acres), of which 96% Pinot Meunier, 2% Pinot Noir, and 2% Chardonnay.
Classification: ”Autre cru” (84%)

Map

The map is linked from Wikimedia Commons, and the geographical information originates from OpenStreetMap. The dotted white area corresponds to the vineyards, light yellow is other open terrain, orange is built-up areas, and green indicates forest.

Neighbouring villages

North: Champlat-et-Boujacourt
Northeast: Chaumuzy
Southeast: Belval-sous-Châtillon
South: Cuchery
Southwest: Baslieux-sous-Châtillon
West: Jonquery
Comment: more links will be added when profiles of the other villages have been uploaded.

The southern entrance to the village. Picture linked from Wikimedia Commons (photo G.Garitan, 2013).

The village

La Neuville-aux-Larris is located on the right bank of the Marne river, which means north of the river. The village is located far up in a curved side valley formed by the stream Ru de Belval.

The La Neuville-aux-Larris commune covers 164 hectares and has a oblong shape in the east-west direction. The commune has 160 inhabitants (as of 2012) referred to as neuvillats and neuvillates.

The town hall (mairie) of La Neuville-aux-Larris. Picture linked from Wikimedia Commons (photo G.Garitan, 2013).

Vineyards

The vineyards in La Neuville-aux-Larris are located to the south of the village, and are situated in a block in a slope where the main part is in the Cuchery commune. A small part of the upper slope that is located in La Neuville-aux-Larris, and these vineyards consist of south- to southwest-facing dominated by Pinot Meunier.

The current vineyard surface in the La Neuville-aux-Larris commune is 6.9 hectares (17.1 acres). There are 6.6 ha Pinot Meunier (96.2%), 0.1 ha Pinot Noir (2%), and 0.1 ha Chardonnay (1.8%). Numbers from CIVC, as of 2013. In 1997, the vineyard surface was also 7 ha. There are 49 vineyard owners (exploitants) in the commune.

Champagne producers

Champagne growers

Producer status is indicated where known: RM = récoltant-manipulant, or grower-producers. RC = récoltant-coopérateur, growers that are cooperative members but sell Champagnes under their own name.

  • René Anceau (RM)
  • Hélène Bertaux-Boulard which has a background in the split of Raymond Boulard, see below. (Unclear if their own bottles are sold by the producer, or if the grapes are sold on.)
  • Billy-Briffoteau (RC)
  • Dominique Boulard & Filles, has vineyards in Cuchery, Paradis (?), and Belval-sous-Châtillon. Has a background in the split of Raymond Boulard, see below.
  • Cabouat-Regnier
  • Claisse et Fils
  • Jacques Devillers & Fils (RM)
  • Christian Girard & Fils (RM)
  • Lionel Girard & Fils (RC)
  • Gougelet-Ruche
  • Lasseaux & Fils
  • Patis-Paille (RM)
  • Roussery-Claisse (RC)
  • Ruelle-Mimin (RC)
  • Christophe Savoye (RM, there are also bottles saying RC that likely are older), has 5.5 ha of vineyards and an annual production of 30 000 bottles.
  • Gérard Savoye
  • Janick Savoye

Comment: It is not certain that the list is complete.

Former producers

  • Raymond Boulard (NM) was a well regarded producer that 2010 was split into three following a change of generation: Hélène Bertaux-Boulard and Dominique Boulard & Filles, both in La Neuville-aux-Larris and mentioned above, and Francis Boulard & Fille in Cauroy-lès-Hermonville (in the Massif de Saint-Thierry are). Raymond Boulard had 10.25 ha of vineyards in 8 villages, of which 4.45 ha in the Vallée de la Marne Rive Droite (75% Pinot Meunier, 20% Pinot Noir, and 5% Chardonnay), 1 ha in the Aisne department, further to the west in the Vallée de la Marne (75% PM and 25% PN), 1.65 ha in the grand cru village Mailly-Champagne in the Grande Montagne de Reims (85% PN and 15% Ch), and 3 ha in the Vallée de la Vesle and Massif de Saint-Thierry (60% Ch, 20% PN, and 20% PM). From 2004 some of the vineyards had organic certification, and of the three new producers it is Francis Boulard who have continued in that style.

Cooperatives

  • Coopérative Vinicole l’Entraide is a cooperative La Neuville-aux-Larris. No information about number of members and so on.

Links

© Tomas Eriksson 2015, last update 2015-05-23

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