Champagne village profile: Fleury-la-Rivière on the right bank of the Marne valley

Diagram Fleury-la-Rivière 201503Key facts

Located in: Vallée de la Marne: Vallée de la Marne Rive Droite
Vineyards and grape varieties: 225,4 hectares (557.0 acres), of which 72% Pinot Meunier, 14,6% Pinot Noir, and 13,4% Chardonnay.
Classification: “Autre cru” (85%)

Map

The map is linked from Wikimedia Commons, and the geographical information originates from OpenStreetMap. The dotted white area corresponds to the vineyards, light yellow is other open terrain, and green indicates forest.

Neighbouring villages

North: Chaumuzy (part of the area Vesle et Ardre)
Northnortheast: Nanteuil-la-Forêt (part of the area Vesle et Ardre)
Northeast: Cormoyeux
Eastsoutheast: Romery
South: Damery
Northwest: Belval-sous-Châtillon
Comment: the remaining link will be added when that profile has been uploaded.

The town hall (mairie) of Fleury-la-Rivière. Picture linked from Wikimedia Commons (photo Pline, 2012).

The village

Fleury-la-Rivière is located on the right bank of the Marne river, but a bit removed from the river in a side valley formed by the small stream Le Brunet.

The Fleury-la-Rivière commune covers 798 hectares and has 514 inhabitants (as of 2012), referred to as fleurysiens and fleurysiennes.

Vineyards

The vineyards in Fleury-la-Rivière mostly consist of mild slopes, to a large proportion southeast-facung slopes with Pinot Meunier som vanligaste druvsort.

The current vineyard surface in the Fleury-la-Rivière commune is 225.4 ha (557.0 acres). There are 162.4 ha Pinot Meunier (72%), 32.9 ha Pinot Noir (14.6%), and 30.1 ha Chardonnay (13.4%). Numbers from CIVC, as of 2013. In 1997, the vineyard surface was 204 ha. There are 137 vineyard owners (exploitants) in the commune.

Vingårdar in Fleury-la-Rivière. Picture linked from Wikimedia Commons (foto Pline, 2012).

Champagne producers

Champagne houses/négociants

The producer status NM = négociant-manipulant means that purchased grapes can be included in the Champagnes. NM producers can be anything from small producers that supplement their own grapes with some that they buy in, to large Champagne houses that primarily rely on purchased grapes.

Champagne growers

Producer status is indicated where known: RM = récoltant-manipulant, or grower-producers. RC = récoltant-coopérateur, growers that are cooperative members but sell Champagnes under their own name.

  • Claude Arnould (RC)
  • Comte de Montperthuis, has vineyards in Fleury-la-Rivère, Damery, and Chambrecy.
  • Gaston Delaunois
  • Demière (RM), also written A & J Demière, member of Vignerons Indépendants. The vineyards are in Fleury-la-Riviere and contain 55% Pinot Meunier, 25% Pinot Noir, and 20% Chardonnay.
  • Pierre Dubois (RM)
  • Duval-Prétrot (RM), member of Vignerons Indépendants.
  • Sylvain Foinon (RM)
  • Goût-Demière (RC)
  • François Heucq (RM)
  • Chantal Lallement (RM), member of Vignerons Indépendants.
  • Daniel Lallement (RM)
  • Legrand-Latour (RC),
  • Didier Marc (RM), also written D. Marc, has 4 ha of vineyards in Fleury-la-Rivière, of which 2.7 ha Pinot Meunier, 1 ha Chardonnay, and 0.3 ha Pinot Noir.
  • Patrice Marc (RM), also written Marc for short, member of Vignerons Indépendants.
  • Maumy-Chapier (RM), has 6.5 ha of vineyards distributed over ten commune in the Côte des Blanc, the Côte Sûd d’Épernay, and the Vallée de la Marne Rive Droite: Avize, Oger, Grauves, Monthelon, Mancy, Chavot, Damery, Fleury-la-Rivière, Cormoyeux, and Passy-Grigny.
  • Ghislain Payer et fille (RC), has 4 ha of vineyards in Fleury-la-Rivière, with 45% Pinot Meunier, 45% Chardonnay, and 10% Pinot Noir.
  • Remy Payer
  • Christophe Pommelet, has 5.4 ha of vineyards with a majority of Pinot Meunier.
  • Philippe Rouyer (RM), member of Vignerons Indépendants, has 4.5 ha of vineyards with 70% Pinot Meunier, 15% Pinot Noir, and 15% Chardonnay.
  • Michel Sibeaux (RC)
  • Th. Thomas-Hatté (RC), where Th. stands for Thierry, has 3.1 ha of vineyards in Fleury-la-Rivière, Mardeuil, and Damery, with 65% Pinot Meunier, 20% Chardonnay, and 15% Pinot Noir.
  • Thomas-Hatté & Fils (RC), has vineyards in Fleury-la-Rivière, Vauciennes, Boursault, and Venteuil.
  • Yannick Vauthier (RC)

Comment: It is not certain that the list is complete.

Cooperatives

  • Coopérative Vinicole de Fleury-la-Rivière (blog) is a cooperative with 126 medlemmar with 117.5 ha of vineyards. It is one of the 82 cooperatives that are member of the major cooperative Centre Vinicole Champagne-Nicolas Feuillatte (CVC-NF), with its main facilities in Chouilly. For Champagnes sold by themselves from their own production they use the brand:
    • François-Principe Arnoult

Links

Video clips

A video clip that shows Fleury-la-Rivière and surrounding vineyards.

© Tomas Eriksson 2015

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Champagne village profile: Cormoyeux on the right bank of the Marne valley

Diagram Cormoyeux 201503Key facts

Located in: Vallée de la Marne: Vallée de la Marne Rive Droite
Vineyards and grape varieties: 75.5 hectares (186.6 acres), of which 61% Pinot Meunier, 19% Pinot Noir and 19% Chardonnay.
Classification: “Autre cru” (85%)

Map

The map is linked from Wikimedia Commons, and the geographical information originates from OpenStreetMap. The dotted white area corresponds to the vineyards, light yellow is other open terrain, and green indicates forest.

Neighbouring villages

North: Nanteuil-la-Forêt (part of the area Vesle et Ardre)
Southeast: Hautvillers (premier cru, part of the Grande Vallée de la Marne)
South: Romery
Southwest: Fleury-la-Rivière

The Church of Cormoyeux, Église Saint-Clément. Picture linked from Wikimedia Commons (photo G.Garitan, 2012).

The village

Cormoyeux is located on the right bank of the Marne river, but a bit removed from the river in a side valley formed by the small stream Le Brunet. The neighbouring villages Romery and Fleury-la-Rivière are located in the same side valley.

The Cormoyeux commune covers 217 hectares and has 111 inhabitants (as of 2012).

Vineyards

The vineyards in Cormoyeux consist of mild slopes of varying exposure (from east- via south- to west-facing) with Pinot Meunier as the most common grape variety.

The current vineyard surface in the Cormoyeux commune is 75.5 ha (186.6 acres). There are 46.1 ha Pinot Meunier (61.1%), 14.7 ha Pinot Noir (19.4%) and 14.4 ha Chardonnay (19.1%). Numbers from CIVC, as of 2013. In 1997, the vineyard surface was 71 ha. There are 25 vineyard owners (exploitants) in the commune.

Single vineyard sites

  • Les Gimpres. Bochet-Lemoine produces a vineyard-designated Champagne from this vineyard, based on Chardonnay vines planted in 1955.

Champagne producers

Champagne houses/négociants

The producer status NM = négociant-manipulant means that purchased grapes can be included in the Champagnes. NM producers can be anything from small producers that supplement their own grapes with some that they buy in, to large Champagne houses that primarily rely on purchased grapes.

  • Francis Mondet (NM), founded in 1928. Has 11 ha of vineyards, primarily in Cormoyeux and Romery, but also in Passy-Grigny.

Champagne growers

Producer status is indicated where known: RM = récoltant-manipulant, or grower-producers. RC = récoltant-coopérateur, growers that are cooperative members but sell Champagnes under their own name.

  • Baudin Fils (RM)
  • Bochet-Lemoine (RM), has 8.5 ha of vineyards in Cormoyeux and Faverolles-et-Coëmy. Produces a vineyard-designated Champagne from Les Gimpres.
  • Boude-Baudin (RC)
  • Dessaint-Tellier (RM), but uncertain if this producer still exists today.
  • Faniel et Fils (RM), earlier written J. Faniel & Fils.
  • Fabrice Lecourt (RM), has 6 ha of vineyards.
  • Vautrin Père & Fils (RM)

Comment: It is not certain that the list is complete.

Links

Video clips

Below a video clip that shows the vineyards in Cormoyeux and surroundings. The camera is located near Romery, the village in the beginning of the clip is Fleury-la-Rivière and the vineyards in Cormoyeux appear in the right-hand edge of the picture at 0:09, i.e., they start to the right of the “wooden wedge”. The vineyards closest to the camera are located in Romery.

© Tomas Eriksson 2015, last updated 2015-03-28

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Champagne village profile: Romery on the right bank of the Marne valley

Diagram Romery 201503Key facts

Located in: Vallée de la Marne: Vallée de la Marne Rive Droite
Vineyards and grape varieties: 72.5 hectares (179.2 acres), of which 60% Pinot Meunier, 27% Chardonnay and 13% Pinot Noir
.
Classification: “Autre cru” (85%)

Map

The map is linked from Wikimedia Commons, and the geographical information originates from OpenStreetMap. The dotted white area corresponds to the vineyards, light yellow is other open terrain, and green indicates forest.

Neighbouring villages

North: Cormoyeux
Southeast: Hautvillers (premier cru, part of the area Grande Vallée de la Marne)
Southwest: Damery
West: Fleury-la-Rivière

Romery and surrounding vineyards. Picture linked from Wikimedia Commons (photo Zubro, 2005).

The village

Romery is located on the right bank of the Marne river, but a bit removed from the river in a side valley formed by the small stream Le Brunet. The neighbouring villages Cormoyeux and Fleury-la-Rivière are located in the same side valley.

The Romery commune covers 207 hectares and has 173 inhabitants (as of 2012) referred to as romanions and romanionnes.

Vineyards

The vineyards in Romery consist of mild west- to south-facing slopes with Pinot Meunier as the most common grape variety.

The current vineyard surface in the Romery commune is 72.5 ha (179.2 acres). There are 43.3 ha Pinot Meunier (59.8%), 19.6 ha Chardonnay (27.1%) and 9.5 ha Pinot Noir (13.1%). Numbers from CIVC, as of 2013. In 1997, the vineyard surface was 69 ha. There are 30 vineyard owners (exploitants) in the commune.

Champagne producers

Champagne houses/négociants

The producer status NM = négociant-manipulant means that purchased grapes can be included in the Champagnes. NM producers can be anything from small producers that supplement their own grapes with some that they buy in, to large Champagne houses that primarily rely on purchased grapes.

Champagne growers

Producer status is indicated where known: RM = récoltant-manipulant, or grower-producers. RC = récoltant-coopérateur, growers that are cooperative members but sell Champagnes under their own name.

  • Pierre Charpentier
  • Daverdon, complete name Sébastien Daverdon, usually written Daverdon Sébastien or Daverdon S., has vineyards in Romery and Hautvillers. Big oak barrels (foudres) are used for some cuvées and the top wine is called Cuvée René (70% Chardonnay and 30% Pinot Noir).
  • Vincent Gobert (RM)
  • José Marc
  • Pingret-Sangret
  • Frédéric Pommelet (RM?), also has a Facebook page.

Comment: It is not certain that the list is complete.

Links

© Tomas Eriksson 2015, last update 2015-03-28

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Champagne village profile: Damery on the right bank of the Marne valley

Diagram Damery 201503Key facts

Located in: Vallée de la Marne: Vallée de la Marne Rive Droite
Vineyards and grape varieties: 407.5 hectares (1007.0 acres), of which 62% Pinot Meunier, 21% Pinot Noir and 17% Chardonnay.
Classification: “Autre cru” (89%)
Noted for: one of the largest villages in terms of vineyard size among the “autres crus”.

Map

The map is linked from Wikimedia Commons, and the geographical information originates from OpenStreetMap. The dotted white area corresponds to the vineyards, light yellow is other open terrain, and green indicates forest.

Neighbouring villages

On the right bank of the Marne
East: Cumières, part of the Grande Vallée de la Marne
Northeast: Romery
North: Fleury-la-Rivière
Westnorthwest: Venteuil

On the left bank of the Marne
Eastsoutheast: Mardeuil, part of the Vallée de la Marne Rive Gauche
Southsoutheast: Vauciennes, part of the Vallée de la Marne Rive Gauche
Westsouthwest: Boursault, part of the Vallée de la Marne Rive Gauche
Comment: more links will be added when profiles of the other villages have been uploaded.

Damery as seen from the vineyards above the village. Picture linked from Wikimedia Commons (photo Zubro, 2005).

The village

Damery is located at the Marne river, on its right bank, which is north of the river. Damery is the easternmost village along the river that isn’t counted as a part of the Grande Vallée de la Marne, which is the wider part of the Marne valley where the premier cru and grand cru villages are located.

The Damery commune covers 1544 hectares and has 1518 inhabitants (as of 2011) called dameziats and dameziates.

Vineyards above Damery. Picture linked from Wikimedia Commons (photo Pline 2012).

Vineyards

The vineyards in Damery consist of dominating south-facing slopes with Pinot Meunier as the most common grape variety.

In similarity to the neighbouring village, Venteuil, Damery was scored 89% on the now-defunct échelle des crus, which means that these villages just missed out on premier cru classification, which was applied to villages in the 90%-99% range on this scale.

The current vineyard surface in the Damery commune is 407.5 hectares (1007.0 acres). There are 252.2 ha Pinot Meunier (61.9%), 84 ha Pinot Noir (20.6%) and 69.6 ha Chardonnay (17.1%). Numbers from CIVC, as of 2013. In 1997, the vineyard surface was also 382 ha. There are 207 vineyard owners (exploitants) in the commune.

Houses that control vineyards in the village include Bollinger, Pol Roger, Roederer, and Taittinger.

Damery Rouge

Some red wine is produced in Damery under the appellation Coteaux Champenois, but Damery Rouge isn’t as common as Cumières Rouge is, the red wine from the neighbouring village Cumières.

Champagne producers

Major Champagne houses, members of the Union des Maisons de Champagne

  • J. de Telmont (NM), a Champagne house founded in 1912 that has 36 ha of vineyards and a production of slightly over one million bottles per year. The founder was called Henri Lhopital and sold Champagne under the family name Lhopital. It was his successor André Lhopital who changed the name to the current one, as well as expanded the vineyards under their control. The two top cuvées are both vintage blanc de blancs produced from grapes from Avize and Chouilly: Grand Couronnement is produced in steel tanks and O.R 1735 ses partial (30-40%) oak barrel treatment. The range also includes a Coteaux Champenois on 100% Chardonnay called Insolite.

Other champagne houses/négociants

The producer status NM = négociant-manipulant means that purchased grapes can be included in the Champagnes. NM producers can be anything from small producers that supplement their own grapes with some that they buy in, to large Champagne houses that primarily rely on purchased grapes.

  • Louis Casters (NM), a house founded in 1899 by Eugène Cadel.
  • Casters-Liebart (NM), a house founded in 1969 where one branch has the same history as Louis Casters.
  • Alexandre Filaine (RM)
  • Pierre Gilbert
  • Romain Guistel (NM), has 5 ha of vineyards. Also uses the brand:
    • Signature, where the vineyard possession is stated to be 22 ha.
  • Haton & Fils (NM), has their own vineyards in five villages, Vauciennes, Boursault, Damery, Fleury-la-Rivière and Cuchery, and purchases grapes from Trépail to make a blanc de blancs.
  • Jean-Noël Haton (NM)
  • A.R. Lenoble (NM), founded by Armand-Raphaël Graser, who moved from Alsace in 1915 and started to sell Champagnes under this name in 1920. Has 18 ha of vineyards, e.g. in Chouilly (Côtes des Blancs) and Bisseuil (Grande Vallée de la Marne). Uses low dosage in their Champagnes, which are partially oaked. The two top cuvées are both blanc de blancs (100% Chardonnay) from Chouilly: Cuvée Gentilhomme and Les Aventures, where the latter is vineyard-designated.
  • Prévoteau-Perrier (NM), produces Champagnes from 30 ha of vineyards, of which 22 ha owned by them, in Damery and surrounding villages in the Vallée de la Marne, in the Coteaux Sud d’Epernay and in Chouilly in the Côte des Blancs. Production is just under 300 000 bottles per year.
  • Rigot-Caillez (NM)

Champagne growers

Producer status is indicated where known: RM = récoltant-manipulant, or grower-producers. RC = récoltant-coopérateur, growers that are cooperative members but sell Champagnes under their own name.

  • Henry Bertrand
  • Marie Josèphe Bertrand
  • Jean Billiard (RM)
  • Blaise-Lourdez et Fils (RM)
  • Daniel Caillez (RM), member of Vignerons Indépendants. Has 5.6 ha of vineyards in Damery and Vauciennes.
  • Caillez-Lemaire (RM), member of Vignerons Indépendants. Has 7 ha of vineyards, of which a little over 4 ha in Damery and the rest in Vauciennes, Cumières, Hautvillers, Fleury-la-Rivière and Chaumuzy. The range includes a Damery Rouge.
  • Charlier-Billiard (RM)
  • Maurice Choppin (RM), has just under 5 ha of vineyards in Damery, Cumières and Saint-Martin-d’Ablois (i Côteaux Sud d’Épernay) with 55% Pinot Meunier, 30% Chardonnay, 12.5% Pinot Noir and 2.5% of the unusual Petit Meslier and Arbanne. Partially uses oak barrels. The two unusual grape varieties end up in a cuvée named Petits Mesliers-Arbannes.
  • Maurice Delabaye et Fils (RM), has about 10 ha of vineyards in Aÿ, Cumières, Hautvillers, Dizy and other villages.
  • André Goutorbe & Fils (RM), member of Vignerons Indépendants. Has 12 ha of vineyards in the Vallée de la Marne consisting of 35% Chardonnay, 15% Pinot Noir and 50% Pinot Meunier.
  • Goutorbe-Bouillot (RM), member of Vignerons Indépendants. Has 9 ha of vineyards, all of it in Damery, with about 50% Pinot Meunier, 25% Chardonnay and 25% Pinot Noir. Annual production is about 55 000 bottles.
  • Eric Lemaire (RM)
  • Henri Lemaire (RM), member of Vignerons Indépendants. Has 6 ha of vineyards in Damery and Cumières.
  • A. Lété (RC), has 9 ha of vineyards in Damery and Fleury-la-Rivière.
  • Pierre Lété (RC)
  • Moinier-Fourny
  • Guy Niziolek (RM)
  • Yannick Prévoteau (RM), has 10 ha distributed over 12 villages.
  • Raymond Vézy (RC)

Comment: The list is probably not complete.

Cooperatives

  • Societe de Vinification is a cooperative with 98 members with a total of 62 ha.

Former Champagne producers

  • Jeeper was started in 1949 in Damery by Armand Goutorbe. Was bought in 2009 by Pressoirs de France in Faverolles-et-Coëmy, where the facilities are now located.

Links

© Tomas Eriksson 2015, last update 2015-03-28

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Red Burgundies from Daniel Rion & Fils

Daniel Rion-flaskor 20150210

The bottles at the left on the table are those from Domaine Daniel Rion & Fils, and those with keen eyesight who know what to look for might even recoignise the red logotype of Rion at some of the labels.

In connection with the 2015 edition of the Bourgogne Wine Tour, that visited Stockholm in February, I tasted some wines from Domaine Daniel Rion et Fils.

Daniel Rion is located in Nuits-Saint-Georges, and has 18 hectares (45 acres) spread over six villages: Nuits-Saint-Georges, Prémeaux-Prissey (that is part of the appellation Nuits-Saint-Georges), Vosne-Romanée, Chambolle-Musigny, Flagey-Échézeaux, Vougeot, and Marey-lès-Fussey (part of the Haut-Côtes de Nuits). They have grand cru vineyards in Échézeaux (0.34 ha) and Clos Vougeot (0.55 ha).

To me, the wines showed a polished and clearly elegant style, in particular (but not unexpectedly) those from Vosne-Romanée. This was a producer that I didn’t have any previous experience from, so it was definitely a pleasant acquaintance!

Wines tasted

2013 Côte de Nuits-Villages

Nose with cherries, berry-dominated with flowery notes. Good concentration on the palate with cherries, good tartness and acidity, pronounced minerality and noticeable tannins. Approx 87 p

2011 Nuits-Saint-Georges Vieilles Vignes

Nose with ripe strawberries, minerality and spices, and a bit of “traditional” notes. Palate with good concentration, cherries, minerality, spices, and some tannic bite. Young, a bit tough at present, 88 p?

2011 Nuits-Saint-Georges Premier Cru Les Hauts Pruliers

Nose with ripe strawberries, some dark berries and liquorice as well as spice notes. Palate with cherries, spice notes, and rather pronounced tannins. Young, 89(+) p

2012 Vosne-Romanée

Nose with cherries, violets and flowery elegance. Palate with good concentration, cherries, violets, noticeable minerality, some firmness with some tannins. Elegant and young, 89(+) p

2012 Vosne-Romanée Premier Cru Les Beaux-Monts

Nose with cherries, spice notes, violets and other flowery notes, elegance and minerality. Not quite as “approachable” in the nose as the village Vosne-Romanée. Palate with good concentration, cherries, high acidity, noticeable minerality, rather prominent tannins, aftertaste with berries, minerality and tannins. Young, almost gives an 2011-like impression, 90+ p

Swedish version here.

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Red Burgundies from Maison Ambroise

Bourgogne Wine Tour 20150210Maison Ambroise was one of the Burgundy producers I tasted when the 2015 edition of Bourgogne Wine Tour visited Stockholm in February.

Ambroise is located in the village Premeaux-Prissey in the Côte de Nuits, and if this village name doesn’t sound familiar it is because the village is a part of the appellation named after its more famous neighbouring village, Nuits-Saint-Georges. Ambroise has 21 hectares (52 acres) of vineyards farmed organically. My impression of their wine style is that it is rather traditional, powerful and going in the tough direction, with rather prominent tannins. With “traditional” I mean that some animal, herbaceous and spicy notes are present already in the young wines, and in this case the oak can also be somewhat felt. This impression is likely reinforced by the typical style of Nuits-Saint-Georges wines, that tend to go in the powerful and almost rustic direction. (Ambroise also produces some reds from appellations that tend to go in the more elegant direction, such as Vosne-Romanée, Échézeaux and Clos Vougeot, but I don’t have any experience of those wines.) This definitely doesn’t mean that the wines lack “polish”, but they don’t show Burgundy from its most silky side. I believe these are wines that may respond positively to cellaring, because they definitely have sufficient “stuffing” to take a long time in the cellar. Ambroise is also a producer I could recommend to those who so to speak prefers to have “a lot of wine” in their Burgundies.

My preliminary impression of the 2013 red Burgundies, based on a number of wines I tasted at this occasion (different producers showed different recent vintages), is that the vintage shows marked acidity, noticeable minerality and that many wines come across as somewhat “hard”, at least at present. Some wines are a bit more fruity, though. Of the four previous vintages (2009-2012) I’d say that 2013 reminds me more of 2011 than it reminds me of any of the other three. On average, there seem to be a bit more generous fruit in 2013 than in 2011 (but not as generous as in e.g. 2012), and I didn’t find any of the green notes that some 2011s show. But all of this is a preliminary impression rather than a final early verdict.

Wines tasted

2013 Bourgogne Rouge

Nose with some traditional notes, cherries, some spices notes and oak. Palate with rather good concentration, strawberries, some minerality, somewhat tough palate, good acidity. Approx. 85 p

2013 Côte de Nuits Villages

Nose with cherries, a bit of traditional notes, rather noticeable spiciness. Palate with rather good concentration, cherries, minerality, high acidity, rather noticeable tannins. Rather tough and young, 87(+) p

2013 Nuits Saint Georges

Nose with cherries, some balsamico?, a hint of traditional notes and some darker (berry) notes. Palate with cherries (rather dark ones), good concentration, good sweetness of fruit, some mineral, good acidity, and rather noticeable tannins. 88-89 p

2012 Corton Grand Cru Le Rognet

Nose with ripe cherries, a slightly flowery notes, spice with some oak. Palate with cherries, good concentration, some spice notes, and quite prominent tannins. Somewhat traditional and rustic, but with a lot of fruit. Young, 90(+) p

Swedish version here.

Posted in Burgundy, Pinot Noir | Leave a comment

Champagne village profile: Janvry in the Monts de Reims

Diagram Janvry 201503Key facts

Located in: Montagne & Val de Reims: Vesle et Ardre
Vineyards and grape varieties: 35 hectares (86.5 acres), of which 79% Pinot Meunier, 12% Chardonnay and 9% Pinot Noir.
Klassificering: “Autre cru” (85%)

Map

The map is linked from Wikimedia Commons, and the geographical information originates from OpenStreetMap. The dotted white area corresponds to the vineyards, light yellow is other open terrain, and green indicates forest.

Neighbouring villages

East: Gueux
Southsouthwest: Méry-Prémecy
West: Germigny
Northwest: Rosnay

The church of Janvry, Église Saint-Remi. Picture linked from Wikimedia Commons (photo Garitan, 2012).

The village

The town hall (mairie) of Janvry. Picture linked from Wikimedia Commons (photo Garitan, 2012).

Janvry is located on top of the Montagne de Reims hill, between the A4 motorway (between Paris and Reims) and the Ardre river. Janvry and Germigny Germigny and Janvry are located just a couple of hundred meters apart, but two villages are separate communes.

The area of Janvry, Germigny and Rosnay is sometimes called the Monts de Reims, not to be confused with the considerably larger area of Montagne de Reims.

The Janvry commune covers 194 hectares and has 137 inhabintants (as of 2012).

Vineyards

The vineyards in Janvry are located around the village and consist of mild slopes of varying direction, with Pinot Meunier as the most common grape variety.

The vineyards can be counted to the Vallée de la Vesle part of the Vesle et Ardre area, but locally the term Les Monts de Reims is also used for the vineyards in Janvry, Germigny and Rosnay.

The current vineyard surface in the Janvry commune is 35 hectares (86.5 acres). There are 27.6 ha Pinot Meunier (78.8%), 4.2 ha Chardonnay (11.9%) and 3.2 ha Pinot Noir (9.3%). Numbers from CIVC, as of 2013. In 1997, the vineyard surface was also 35 ha, but it was only in the 1950s when more extensive viticulture started in the commune. Today, there are 33 vineyard owners (exploitants) in the commune.

Single vineyard sites

  • Les Hauts du Chapitre. Michel Beauchamp produces a cuvée (Pinot Noir and Chardonnay) from this site, under the name Cuvée Eliane Les Hauts Du Chapitre.

Champagne producers

Champagne growers

Producer status is indicated where known: RM = récoltant-manipulant, or grower-producers. RC = récoltant-coopérateur, growers that are cooperative members but sell Champagnes under their own name.

  • Serge Armand
  • Armand-Blin (RC)
  • Beauchamp (RM), also Michel Beauchamp, a member of Vignerons Indépendantes with 6 ha of vineyards spread over the Massif de Saint-Thierry, Montagne de Reims, the Janvry area, the Aÿ area, Vallée de la Marne and Vallée de l’Ardre. The range includes a vineyard-designated Champagne, Cuvée Eliane Les Hauts du Chapitre (a blend of Pinot Noir andChardonnay) from a site in Janvry.
  • Robert Gervais
  • Lamblot (RC), has vineyards in the Montagne de Reims, Vallée de l’Ardre, and in the area around Janvry. Used to be called René Lamblot and has formerly been an RM.
  • Jacky Martin (RC, also has a blog and a Facebook page), has 1.87 ha of vineyards in Janvry and Courcelles-Sapicourt, and an annual production of up to 12 000 bottles.
  • Yves Masson (RC)
  • Ponsart-Delagarde (RC)
  • Saillard-Martin
  • Clément Victor

Comment: It is not certain that the list is complete.

Cooperative

  • Coopérative Vinicole de Germigny, Janvry, Rosnay, also called Coopérative Vinicole GJR, is a cooperative with 157 members with a total of 117.68 ha in some 40 villages. It was founded in 1961 by seven growers in Janvry who then had 17 ha between them. The cooperative sells its Champagnes under different brands with different profiles:
    • CH. de l’Auche (CH. is supposed to be read out as C-H since they aren’t a château), where the Champagnes mostly consist of Pinot Meunier and sometimes a smaller proportion of Pinot Noir. This brand has been used since 1975 and the name was taken from a vineyard site that long have been used by the cooperative. The top cuvée is called La Cuvée du Chapitre, consist of 100% Pinot Meunier and is non-vintage.
    • Prestige des Sacres (also has a Facebook page), where Pinot Meunier, Pinot Noir and also Chardonnay is used in the range, although not all three in all cuvées. The top wine of the range is traditionally a vintage Champagne called Cuvée Privilège that consists of Pinot Noir and Chardonnay (typically 50% of each), in similarity to a vintage rosé called Cuvée Grenat. In 2014, a new high-end Champagne was added: La Cuvée Boisée, consisting of 30% oaked Pinot Meunier and 70% Chardonnay. The name of the brand has been taken from the nickname of the city of Reims, la Cité des Sacres.
    • Charles de Courcelle
    • Hubert de Lossey, which as least earlier has been used as a brand, seems to have the same varietal composition as Ch. de l’Auche.
    • Philippe de Morney
    • Coopérative Vinicole GJR also provides Champagne Marquis de Sade with bottles. Marquis de Sade is a marque de acheteur (MA), i.e., a brand without production facilities of their own that is owned by the company Maison de Sade in the Parisian suburb Boulogne-Billancourt, and it is a descendant of the (in)famous marquis that is behind this company. The brand’s bottles have been supplied by different producers during the years. At the launch in 1989 (see this article in the NY Times) they were supplied by Michel Gonet in Avize.

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© Tomas Eriksson 2015

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